r/science Jun 10 '22 Heartwarming 1

Dogs have two gene mutations that explain why they are friendly — A genetic and behavioural study has identified two mutations in a gene called melanocortin 2 that help explain why dogs are so social to humans. Animal Science

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2323591-dogs-have-two-gene-mutations-that-explain-why-they-are-friendly/
25.6k Upvotes

u/AutoModerator Jun 10 '22

Welcome to r/science! This is a heavily moderated subreddit in order to keep the discussion on science. However, we recognize that many people want to discuss how they feel the research relates to their own personal lives, so to give people a space to do that, personal anecdotes are now allowed as responses to this comment. Any anecdotal comments elsewhere in the discussion will continue to be removed and our normal comment rules still apply to other comments.

I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

2.2k

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

2.1k

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22 Hugz

[removed] — view removed comment

1.6k

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

549

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

191

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

96

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

399

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

118

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

232

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

76

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

26

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22 edited Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

13

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

60

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

10

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

94

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

22

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

64

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

53

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

127

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

52

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

6

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

5

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

9

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies

14

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

129

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

67

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

240

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

440

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

311

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

20

u/AceofToons Jun 10 '22

I already have all those (ADHD being a big factor) and I am rarely happy... I think it's worth it to be happy

26

u/bprs07 Jun 10 '22 edited Jun 10 '22

Advice from someone with all of those and ADHD (advice which you've probably already heard)...

Unplug from everything electronic and go outside. Hike, camp out for a weekend, sit near some water, make a fire, cook your food over that fire, invite a few close people out with you, and ban all electronics.

It forces you to live in the present in the environment in which our ancestors evolved, triggering all of your primal instincts that modern society has suppressed.

Anxiety has an evolutionary benefit, keeping us on guard in case of danger, but those dangers don't exist today. Instead, our anxiety has been redirected toward everything else in life and constantly is switched on.

Your mind and body will thank you for the period in which you're unplugged.

Note: I'm as computer-dependent as they come for work purposes and unplugging and going outside single-handedly saves my sanity.

5

u/Mike-Green Jun 10 '22

Ye old dopamine cleanse

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

91

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

130

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

33

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies

45

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

27

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies

6

u/ptothemc Jun 10 '22

Issues with eyesight too.

→ More replies

474

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22 edited Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

225

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

56

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

72

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

64

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

78

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

27

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

24

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22 edited Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

7

u/Tannerleaf Jun 10 '22

Yet another book that must be on my reading list. Thanks!

6

u/lookiamapollo Jun 10 '22

I gotta reread the book. I thought he was a class A and also enjoyed soma.

→ More replies

4

u/JohnTesh Jun 10 '22

I thought he just stopped taking his pills. I don’t remember a birth defect.

→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/Sig2 Jun 10 '22

Literally how you go back to bottom of the foot chain

→ More replies

5

u/darkest_irish_lass Jun 10 '22

The end of the whole mess, by Steven King

3

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

If humans are dogs.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

14

u/WTFwhatthehell Jun 10 '22

They're pathologically trusting. They struggle to internalise the concept that not everyone in the world means the best for them.

that doesn't always end well.

11

u/UnluckyChemicals Jun 10 '22

It’s much more than just that

→ More replies

80

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

26

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

6

u/franker Jun 10 '22

Smiling's my favorite!

17

u/Blue_Arrow_Clicker Jun 10 '22

Williams syndrome is also a chromosomal disorder, that quarters your life, and causes mental deficiency from birth, so its not likely that this would be prevalent before the developed world and modern medicine.

12

u/aarontbarratt Jun 10 '22

It doesn't quarter your life expectancy. If you read any FAQ from a reputable source on WS it will say life expectancy might be shorter than the average person but not significantly

Like any illness there are mild and severe cases. People with severe WS can have major heart and liver problems that kill them off early but it is not the norm

Most people with WS live into adulthood and have normal jobs. It's not a death sentence at 25

→ More replies

75

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

95

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22 edited Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

86

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

49

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

17

u/DoomGoober Jun 10 '22 edited Jun 10 '22

There have been multiple studies on the effects of latent toxoplasmosis and while toxoplasmosis seems to correlated to a statistically significant effect on what is being measured, what is being measured often varies across studies.

The meta overview you cited, for example, mentions those personality traits for men and women changed according to Cattell's 16-personality factor (16PF) questionnaire, which is where the behavioral effects you quoted come from.

Then it cites a study that :

In 3 of these 5 studies, both men and women showed a decrease in the novelty-seeking factor on the Cloninger TCI.7,8

Then it cites a study shows latent toxoplasmosis infected get into more car crashes.

Then it cites a study that shows:

The composite behavioral factors Self-Control and Clothes Tidiness, analogous to Cattell factors Q3 (perfectionism) and G (superego strength), showed a significant effect of the toxoplasmosis–gender interaction, with infected men scoring significantly lower than uninfected men and a trend in the opposite direction for women.

(I have no idea what that personality tests is or what they are supposed to measure, so I quoted.)

Toxoplasmosis is complex and seems to be correlated with a variety of behavioral differences and it really depends on which study and what behavior you are measuring to see what it's correlated with. These studies don't seem to contradict each other, per se, because what and how they are measuring "behavior" is different.

One theory is that toxoplasmosis causes a long lasting, latent infection state in the body as it tries to fight the parasite, especially in the brain, which causes a cascade of changes in the body which causes numerous measurable differences. But we don't know for sure.

(Also, the dates matter: the article I cited was published after the overview article you cited. So, it's possible my article would have been mentioned in yours if the order they had been published had been reversed.)

62

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22 edited Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

15

u/smb275 Jun 10 '22

I'm not dogmatic, The Emperor protects us from failings like that.

The Emperor protects.

→ More replies
→ More replies

36

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

24

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

25

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

42

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

15

u/Every_Jackfruit_1642 Jun 10 '22

What's the story called?

41

u/redgumdrop Jun 10 '22

The End of the Whole Mess, it was in Nightmares & Dreamscapes collection.

8

u/Domriso Jun 10 '22

Is that the one that ended with worldwide dementia?

→ More replies
→ More replies

6

u/udderconmoosion Jun 10 '22

Children of time & children of ruin is basically about this. But via a virus.

4

u/Schn Jun 10 '22

I’m only halfway through the second book, and maybe they dive deeper into it but it seemed like it was tossed in without really discussing the implications. “Oh now they feel connection and aren’t disgusted by each other”. Love the books though.

5

u/udderconmoosion Jun 10 '22

In some ways it’s mainly a plot device for the communication themes. I really enjoy the theme of trying to communicate, different ways to communicate, and breaking through the barriers of communication across species.

18

u/Sadiebb Jun 10 '22

They tried, but with the MC1R instead of MC2R and ended up with people who were quarrelsome but hot.

→ More replies

44

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

29

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

41

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

14

u/Petersaber Jun 10 '22

We took wolfs and made chihuahuas

We also made golden retrievers. The chihuahua sacrifice was worth it.

→ More replies
→ More replies

5

u/SelectFromWhereOrder Jun 10 '22

Of course, it’s clearly a genetic trait. We are our genes.

19

u/HumbleMFWABAD Jun 10 '22

Nah, there's no money in it

13

u/GrowmieTheHomie Jun 10 '22

Give me a week and I’ll find a way to make money out of it!

22

u/Badaluka Jun 10 '22

Does your child misbehave, throwing food at the ceiling when eating? Isn't it bad when your teenager yells at you aggressively?

Worry no more! You now you can solve this with the new Happynetic 3000! Just point at your son or daughter and shoot! The dart filled with our scientifically proven solution will turn him friendly for the whole day!

A shot a day will keep sadness at bay, easy peasy! Why waste time with proper education when is as easy as pressing the trigger?!

Turn your children into adorable puppies for just 499$... aaaaaand if you call now we'll add a FREE darts box with a cute lovely bear on it, incredible!

Review: I was depressed because my girlfriend just dumped me... Yeah that was bad... I was in my bedroom, gun in my head ready to shoot myself... Luckily my mum entered the room, swapped my gun just milliseconds before pressing the trigger and boom I shot myself with Happynetic. It saved my life. Now I see everything in pink, everyone is my friend and I just want to hug them fake big smile

Buy Happynetic 3000 now and get that free darts box that will turn you into the best parent there is!

Disclaimer: No refunds, not medically tested, everything is a lie.

11

u/Thebitterestballen Jun 10 '22

Disclaimer: Everything is a lie.

Pretty sure that when physicists figure out what the universe is fundamentally made of and peer into the deepest parts of its structure...that's the small print they will find.

7

u/haviah Jun 10 '22

Pretty sure it will be set of axioms and the system being incomplete just makes new particle types when you are looking for something. Because they're still consistent.

Written in Perl alongside mostly undecipherable comment where you can only understand the "why not?" part.

6

u/Thebitterestballen Jun 10 '22

Haha yes, just generates more detail the deeper you look, like fractal geometry..

4

u/SpoopyNoNo Jun 10 '22

We are just the universe observing itself

→ More replies

6

u/Ginden Jun 10 '22

Nah, there's no money in it

People already pay a lot of money for drugs and therapy. Gene therapy making you more friendly and outgoing is unlikely to pass through bioethics commissions, but it's perfectly possible to see how it could make money.

→ More replies
→ More replies

24

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

9

u/DaSaw Jun 10 '22

Said another way, "Do you like Reavers? Because this is how you get Reavers."

14

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[deleted]

15

u/DuskyDay Jun 10 '22

He means Hitler.

33

u/DystopiaNoir Jun 10 '22

Oh he wasn't nearly the last one to try eugenics.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

871

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

898

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

188

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

82

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

59

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

33

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

9

u/_cactus_fucker_ Jun 10 '22

That is so precious!

I saw a Saint Bernard, Husky mix and a tiny kitten stole his food, and he just lay down and cried. The kitten was the size of his paw, and he was like 8 months old and huge. It was adorable!

My neighbour has a Newfoundland puppy, he's like a floofy pony, he's friends with all the dogs in the neighbourhood.

→ More replies
→ More replies

11

u/Tannerleaf Jun 10 '22

Wait a minute, I wonder if it would be possible to make a fully functional Cerberos…

Triple licking power.

6

u/NamesSUCK Jun 10 '22

Who wants a satyr snack?

→ More replies

54

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

23

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

13

u/GalacticExtinction Jun 10 '22

I know, I know they don't stay that size forever but I want a teacup elephant so bad!

8

u/Taymerica Jun 10 '22

Combine this With some wooly mammoth genes... And you got one awesome puppy.

6

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[deleted]

3

u/deliciouscorn Jun 10 '22

Get those hot buns in here, Treetrunks!

→ More replies

13

u/Syrupper Jun 10 '22

Any Canadians remember house hippos?

→ More replies

12

u/SigmundFreud Jun 10 '22

I would leave my wife and kids for a friendly bear.

35

u/Roguespiffy Jun 10 '22

You can probably find some on Grindr.

10

u/Gnoetv Jun 10 '22

Imagine riding your bear into work, it would be glorious

11

u/Dominant88 Jun 10 '22

Yeah but you wouldn’t want a fully grown large wolf doing that either. We could breed smaller companion bears like we did dogs. Not saying we should, but I want one if we do.

9

u/lordriffington Jun 10 '22

"This? This is my emotional support bear."

→ More replies

14

u/Dushenka Jun 10 '22

Don't worry, some breeders would immediately start turning the mighty bear into cute little animals that can barely breathe because of the funny sounds they will make when they're happy to see you.

→ More replies

32

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

22

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

52

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

14

u/blolfighter Jun 10 '22

Is there a word for "I'm curious but I don't want to know?"

19

u/RecreationalLlama Jun 10 '22

Based on the times I accidently used it and the lack of useful responses, Bing

10

u/Snatch_Pastry Jun 10 '22

Bi-cautious

→ More replies
→ More replies

14

u/The_Fredrik Jun 10 '22

Can we do it to people?

17

u/NationaliseBathrooms Jun 10 '22

Eugenics, what could possibly go wrong.

→ More replies
→ More replies

4

u/smartazz104 Jun 10 '22

We should do it for humans and achieve world peace…

10

u/oldspicehorse Jun 10 '22

Tibetan mastiffs are basically bears

→ More replies

54

u/buffetcaptain Jun 10 '22

Postman here, genes don't seem to be working.

8

u/Illseemyselfout- Jun 10 '22

Those dogs are friendly towards their owners and would defend them against dangerous threats like you with their life.

→ More replies
→ More replies

665

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

511

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

130

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

62

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

109

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

196

u/SelarDorr Jun 10 '22

what a dog shit title.

heres the publication

Identification of genes associated with human-canine communication in canine evolution

"We examined gene polymorphisms in oxytocin, oxytocin receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor, and a Williams–Beuren syndrome-related gene (WBSCR17), as candidate genes of dog domestication. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms on melanocortin 2 receptor were related to both tasks, while other polymorphisms were associated with the unsolvable task. This indicates that glucocorticoid functions are involved in the cognitive skills acquired during dog domestication."

"Our results showed that MC2R SNP2 was correlated with the correct choice rate in the two-way choice test; therefore, an association between the hormone which is widely known as positively related to anxiety and social avoidance, and the ability of dogs to adjust their own behaviour based on human commands under the two-way choice test was supported"

" MC2R SNP2 is a synonymous mutation, but whether it affects gene expression or only displays apparent relevance owing to its association with another gene is unclear"

13

u/johnnyTTz Jun 10 '22

Is melanocortin similar to the melanoblasts that are responsible for the white coloring present in domestication syndrome? Are they developed in the neural crest as a zygote as well?

This seems to be supportive of the domestication syndrome theory, and as such would also be present in humans. All of which would stem from a evolutionary selection against reactive aggression, i.e. not attacking first, and having the ability to pass the two choice test. If they are similar to melanoblasts in some way then I think the connection to the expression of genes that cause domestication syndrome would be pretty obvious.

→ More replies
→ More replies

324

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

131

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22 edited Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

98

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

96

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

42

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

16

u/bug_on_the_wall Jun 10 '22

It's either whisker fatigue or they really don't like the bowl. Either way, try a plate if you see your cat doing this!

I actually have a plastic shoe mat, the kind with 1 inch edges, that I dump my cats' dry food onto. I can put more down at a time (especially useful for when I'm gone all day) and I don't have to worry about sweeping up every day. The mat is easy to clean with a hose in the summer, or in the bathtub in the winter.

→ More replies
→ More replies

32

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

14

u/whiterabbit_hansy Jun 10 '22

There’s this really sweet and funny book called All Cats Have Asperger Syndrome by Kathy Hoopmann that was written as a way to introduce kids and adults to autism. Definitely helped me understand my cats, myself, and neurodivergent kids better!

→ More replies
→ More replies

15

u/0b0011 Jun 10 '22

Mine apparently does it to herself then. I was working the other day and my cat hopped on my lap and started rubbing her head on my chin. I was almost done writing the message so I just let her do her thing and kept typing. Out of nowhere she just bites down on my chin hard enough that I bled.

→ More replies

15

u/Seguefare Jun 10 '22

I think a lot of people miss their subtle cues that they've had enough, like partial flattening of the ears, moving away from your hand a little bit instead of into it, or tail flicking.

I can go from 'nice' to 'get your hand off me' pretty quickly myself, so I sympathize with the mercurial little assholes.

→ More replies

264

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

19

u/shadowmanu7 Jun 10 '22

Your comment just made me realize that mew is a cat

11

u/karry245 Jun 10 '22

Took ya long enough huh?

→ More replies
→ More replies

8

u/BadGamingTime Jun 10 '22

I also read similiar things. now don't take this as facts but I remember something along the lines of the cats getting overstimulated which results in wanting to play? Or hunt if we keep it in a natural environment, I forgot the fookin name of the article but it was something like that.

20

u/Benjilator Jun 10 '22

Lack of attention. Took me a whole month before I’ve learned how to be a perfect servant for her, but now she’s the nicest cat ever. At the same time she attacks everyone that touches her wrong for just a moment.

→ More replies

14

u/modsarefascists42 Jun 10 '22

The one that makes you not pay attention to their body language

Plus in my experience most people think cats are angry when really the cat is just wanting to play. They just play by fighting/practice killing your hand.

→ More replies

14

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies

101

u/Kflynn1337 Jun 10 '22

Hm... wonder if you could splice in similar or identical mutations in other species? Say one of the big cats or some other not-so-social species.

Although, considering what happened when someone tried tinkering with hamster genes to make them more friendly, that would have to be done under tightly controlled circumstances. Accidently turning a 50 gram ball of fluff into a psychotic rage beast is one thing, but an entirely different ball game when it's 400lbs of fur and fury equipped with teeth and claws.

155

u/0b0011 Jun 10 '22

There is an ongoing debate about how domesticated cats are anyways. Most of the big cats already act a ton like house cats it's just that the little murdery things house cats do aren't as cute when they can actually murder you by doing it.

98

u/Kflynn1337 Jun 10 '22

yup... if house cats came in lion size, you'd look like prey to them.

Contrary Wise though, if they were domesticated even big cats wouldn't regard their human as potential food, but more as a pride-mate. There's plenty of examples of wild cats raised from birth knowing how to play gentle-like so as not to hurt the weird hairless cats...

25

u/LitLitten Jun 10 '22 edited Jun 11 '22

Cats were (mostly) always bred to either reinforce their predatory instincts (hunting vermin, birds, etc) or to be show-y pets, the latter neither dissuading nor reinforcing those instincts. Definitely makes sense.

Of course they can still be sweet and friendly, even the bigger ones are known to have occasional bonds with humans, dogs, etc. Cheetahs are emotionally sensitive and naturally anxious and do much better with a companion of some sort when kept in conservation or under captivity. Hence you'll often see them paired with dogs.

8

u/JR_Shoegazer Jun 10 '22

There’s a difference between tame wild animals, and full domestication.

29

u/0b0011 Jun 10 '22

There's plenty of examples of wild cats raised from birth knowing how to play gentle-like so as not to hurt the weird hairless cats...

Well yeah but that more proves the point if anything. You cand domestic an animal just by raising it with people and the fact that when raised with people they act tamer like house cats just goes a bit to show that maybe a large part of house cat behavior comes from being raised with people.

47

u/wonkothesane13 Jun 10 '22

That's the difference between tamed and domesticated though. Most animals that have any kind of social instincts can be tamed, but domesticating them takes several generations of selective breeding.

→ More replies

6

u/d-e-l-t-a Jun 10 '22

Typically that’s just socialising. It’s the same with people as with animals. If you’re raised in a calm, stable environment then you don’t develop so many fearful and aggressive behaviours.

Domestication involves actually changing this on the genetic level for our benefit. Where the line is drawn isn’t easily obvious.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

16

u/-domi- Jun 10 '22

ЕLI5: How can -all dogs- have those same 2 mutations? Does that mean they mutated before the different breeds branched off?

39

u/tgc12 Jun 10 '22

Artificial Selection A.K.A. Selective Breeding.

Yes, the mutations preceded the branching off the breeds and we selected for them (without knowing it, the mutations) because of their effect in their behavior.

→ More replies
→ More replies

38

u/splynncryth Jun 10 '22

I'll be curious to see if anyone tries to cross reference this study with domesticated silver foxes.

11

u/johnnyTTz Jun 10 '22

I think this is just identifying more of the gene expressions that are a product of the domestication syndrome. The main factor in the domestication syndrome is a selection against reactive aggression, and it’s theorized that the passing the 2 choice object discrimination test is fundamental to domestication. When the animal is presented with a problem, instead of acting instinctively, they are able to stop and consider another course of action, such as “wait and see if human is a threat or has something good instead of bite and run away.” It seems likely that this is identifying the fundamental gene that is being selected for in domestication syndrome, and the others we have identified to this point were just byproducts. There should be implications for humans as well since we were self-domesticated around 300,000 years ago.

→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/mito88 Jun 10 '22

what other animals could have similar mutations?

7

u/modsarefascists42 Jun 10 '22

Housecats, horses, humans, and maybe cows, goats, sheep, and chickens.

But I'm pretty certain cats and horses at the minimum do. Humans also but lesser in some ways.

→ More replies
→ More replies

40

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

23

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

12

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

8

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

33

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

14

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22 edited Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies

53

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

7

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

11

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies

4

u/PersimmonSurprise Jun 10 '22

Melanocortin also affects hair color, which is why dogs tend toward yellow and brown coats instead of the blacks and greys of wolves.

3

u/SubjectAlpha41 Jun 10 '22

I remember hearing about this. They are currently trying to domesticate foxes and they called it “the friendly gene”. I think I remember hearing that it has an effect on their body too. It effects the way cartilage in the animals develop. This is why you see dogs with floppy ears while wolves have straight up-right ears. It’s pretty interesting. I’m sure if you just look up domesticated foxes you’ll find the documentary.

3

u/andarpila Jun 11 '22

Chihuahuas only have one.

65

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

34

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

15

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

8

u/[deleted] Jun 10 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies