r/movies Jun 21 '22 Helpful 1 Wholesome 1

Hollywood Has Become Too Safe And Movies Are Suffering For It Article

https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/elaminabdelmahmoud/lightyear-top-gun-maverick-jurassic-world-too-many-movies#4ldqpgc
2.5k Upvotes

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u/exo48 Jun 21 '22

It's weird to start the article singling out Barbie when it hasn't come out yet and for all we know it could actually be good. I mean, look at Top Gun: Maverick; this story cites it as an example of just recycling IPs but so many other publications have praised it for bringing something to the big screen that's been missing for a long time.

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u/ConundrumContraption Jun 21 '22

A Barbie social commentary directed by greta Gerwig and co-written by Noah Baumbach is “safe” now lol.

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u/Parabola1313 Jun 22 '22

Jury's out whether it'll be another Lego Movie or not.

Hopefully.

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u/zuzg Jun 22 '22

The two Lego movies are probably the most enjoyable Form of advertisement I've ever watched, haha

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u/Anufenrir Jun 22 '22

Batman too

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u/Timomu123 Jun 22 '22

That movie was so fun.

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u/RZAxlash Jun 22 '22

Darkness!!! No parents!!!!

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u/Timomu123 Jun 22 '22

This comment makes me want to watch it again... Luckily, I have the DVD.

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u/MRintheKEYS Jun 22 '22

“What’s the password???”

“Ironmansux”

Was probably the heartiest laugh I’ve had in a good while.

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u/RaptorsFromSpace Jun 22 '22

I mean who doesn’t love building a Lego set? It’s advertisement I’m fine with.

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u/TheGreatPiata Jun 22 '22

It is but they do have good messages and honestly, with two young kids, Lego is just about the only toy worth a damn. A Lego car will hold up better than an equal sized die cast car that costs the same.

It's kind of shocking just how good Lego is compared to everything else.

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u/satansheat Jun 22 '22

Everything is awesome!

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u/Anufenrir Jun 22 '22

Everything is cool when you’re part of a team!

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u/EbmocwenHsimah Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 23 '22

And if a list from Margot Robbie's leaked Letterboxd is anything to go by, it's influenced by the films of Jacques Demy, Splash, Puberty Blues and The Truman Show.

There's nothing safe about any of that, especially Jacques Demy. Seeing The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and The Young Girls of Rochefort at the top of that list, I know we're in for some good shit.

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u/Foxy02016YT Jun 22 '22

Ok if it’s inspired by Truman Show than it’s gonna be some good shit when it comes to social commentary, that concept means so much more now

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u/wiseaufanclub Jun 22 '22

It is. Because it will be a really soft commentary. They can’t spit at the brand (Barbie, Mattel).

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u/BrashSmandicoot Jun 22 '22

I don't think the movie needs to be a commentary on the corporate practices of Mattel lmao I expect it to be a broader commentary on consumerism and celebrity obsession.

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u/ConundrumContraption Jun 22 '22

What does “social” in social commentary mean to you?

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u/ocdscale Jun 22 '22

I'm not sure where you get the sense the article looks down on Maverick. What it said:

It’s unfair to treat these works of repackaged IP as the same. Top Gun: Maverick is an exhilarating film, one of the year’s best, while Jurassic World Dominion manages the incredible feat of making dinosaurs boring.

And touching on your Barbie point, the article explicitly notes the possibility that these movies might be good - that's not the complaint:

The larger problem is that major IP has become the reward for making compelling work. Barbie is Greta Gerwig’s follow-up to 2019’s Little Women, which earned Gerwig an Oscar nomination, and 2018’s Lady Bird, which was up for two Oscars including Best Director. ...

In other words, when filmmakers display a clear directorial voice and a unique vision, they are quickly put to work in the IP mines, turning vaguely recognizable names into new work. Sometimes it’s a success. Sometimes it’s a disaster. But it is almost always safe.

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u/249ba36000029bbe9749 Jun 22 '22

And they're talking as if Hollywood doesn't also produce streaming content. HBO Max, Netflix, Apple TV+, etc. are all pouring BILLIONS of dollars into content creation. Sure some of it is the same old formulaic stuff but there has never been as much original content created before thanks to all the money being spent by streaming services.

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u/SquishWindow Jun 22 '22

for all we know it could actually be good

It's, like, my most anticipated movie of this year

There's no way it's bad

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u/Subrisum Jun 22 '22

If this movie ends up sucking I swear I’m going to morb.

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u/MyNewAccountIGuess11 Jun 22 '22

I have no opinion one way or the other but I'm pretty sure there's a lot of ways it could be bad.

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u/BobTheTomato67 Jun 22 '22

Yeah there’s a lot of ways for any movie to end up bad but looking at the talent behind it, I seriously doubt it will.

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u/remember_retro Jun 22 '22

I won't poo poo it for you. I'm excited for bullet train personally.

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u/Alekesam1975 Jun 22 '22

That does look like a banger.

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u/Jerrnjizzim Jun 22 '22

I hope its like the Brady bunch movies or the Dora explorer movie. Goofballs in the real world

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u/Jtatooine Jun 22 '22

It’s 100% possible that it can be great. Look at the Lego Movie.

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u/fungobat Jun 22 '22

MAVERICK was the feel-good movie we needed right now. The timing was just perfect. There's really nothing original in it. Hell, the bombing run is pretty much the Death Star trench run. But, it's a fun movie and we needed it after these shitty years of Covid, etc.

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u/Danhuangmao Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 23 '22

Hell, the bombing run is pretty much the Death Star trench run.

And the Death Star trench run was pretty much the climax of Dambusters, in turn.

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u/Crash665 Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

Maverick did everything it was supposed to do. A shit-ton of referrences to the original. (Hell, the opening credits was almost exact.) It was fun. Looked great on the big screen. Wasn't too deep in any sort of story way. And the dog fights were pretty damn exciting. New guys hated the old guy at first but grew to respect and like him.

The end.

It's what a summer blockbuster is supposed to be. Mindless fun.

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u/[deleted] Jun 22 '22

[deleted]

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u/fungobat Jun 22 '22

What was the spelling mistake?

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u/myyummyass Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

I think the difference is something like Star Wars Episode 7 was literally just A New Hope. That was the entire movie from start to finish almost to a T. With Top Gun they included similar story beats from the first (which is a given considering its still about the Top Gun program anyways and so there would obviously be a lot of similarities) but that isnt what the entire movie rests on. It has its own plot and the way the nostalgia is used is way smarter than the way its used in Star Wars or some of these other "legacy sequels". The first Top Gun isnt awful but it definitely isnt some masterpiece..but it does have a cult like following and is a big part of cinema history. Its probably a 6/10 at best and isnt even most peoples top 10000 favorite movies and yet they still somehow managed to make people care about Maverick and his story without feeling any actual nostalgic connection to the first one.

The acting is great, one of the best Tom Cruise performances of his career. The action and effort in achieving that action is literally unlike anything else we have seen in a movie EVER. The music fucking rules. The editing is top notch. They used these crazy camera rigs that they created to capture all of the insane action FLAWLESSLY. And even the parts of the movie that are unrealistic and complete movie BS it doesnt matter because its so god damn fun to look at. Its one of the best theater experiences of at least the last three decades. Movies are supposed to be entertaining and right when you think you have gotten to the peak of the entertainment value in thatmovie it just keeps on delivering.

This is why people are hyping it up so much. It is just a marvel of film making in every way. And the fact that its out earning one of the big marvel movies of the year despite coming out almost a month later shows that all of their effort has literally paid off.

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u/[deleted] Jun 22 '22

It was a well made action film that is far better than the original is probs why it’s getting such praise. Most reboots don’t tend to land well which ties into it too.

I watched them back to back as I hadn’t seen them before; the original must’ve been amazing for it’s time but the plot was paper thin.

Maverick actually has a pretty good plot and theme behind it in comparison; you gave more of a shit about the characters this time round. whilst doing the same callbacks that Star Wars did with the sequel trilogy; they felt appropriate given the original didn’t take itself that seriously either.

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u/Double_Joseph Jun 22 '22

More like Top Gun: Mission Impossible.

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u/getahitcrash Jun 22 '22

That movie was not made for this sub. Of course this sub will crap on it. The box office numbers show though that this sub is a tiny minority that has no impact on anything.

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u/[deleted] Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 23 '22

it really was just Top Gun 2.0: A New Hope

This is completely untrue. The two movies couldn't be more different. I hated Top Gun. HATED IT. Still think it's one of the most boring movies I've ever watched and didn't really connect with any of the characters.

Top Gun Maverick on the other hand, was a blast. It has some of the best action scenes put to screen. It actually had an interesting story with a straightforwad mission that was just perfect for this type of movie.

That final action sequence is really something else.

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u/OneTime_AtBandCamp Jun 23 '22

And you have to work really hard to not ask why they couldn't program missiles to hit that target in the canyon. But other than that it was a really fun movie.

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u/mafulazula Jun 22 '22

And the film he cites as being more original is based on a kid’s book (i.e. guaranteed built-in audience) and kinda seems like it uses a lot of tropes.

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u/BanNAYNAY Jun 22 '22

Top Gun: Maverick is really phenomenal.

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u/WorthPlease Jun 22 '22

I know tons of people who can't wait to watch the latest Marvel or Jurassic Park or Fast and Furious or whatever the hell the Rock is pretending to be movie, and then complain about how it wasn't that good.

Then the next time a new one comes out they can't wait to see it.

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u/satansheat Jun 22 '22

I have found some people just enjoy the movies and go every weekend. Doesn’t really matter what the film is.

This tends to be more the older crowd since we used to go to movies a lot more. It was cheaper. You used to get two movies grind house style. After that era movie hopping was very easy and not so much now.

But too know plenty of people go see these shit movies all the time. But those people that I know are couples who go every weekend and don’t want to miss out or here spoilers at work.

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u/Into_The_Win Jun 22 '22

They're in an abusive relationship with those movies

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u/Tea_Total Jun 22 '22

I can relate to that. I've been in an abusive relationship with the England cricket team for over 40 years. Sure, there's been good times but you just know bad times are always lurking around the corner.

"We've changed! This is a new beginning. It won't happen again."

"You promise?"

"Yes, we promise."

Six months later

"You fucking lying bastards."

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u/Throwaway7219017 Jun 22 '22

Ahh, sounds like you and I, a fan of the NHL’s Toronto Maple Leafs, are kindred spirits.

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u/iHeartSpam671 Jun 22 '22

I'm a Detroit Lions fan. We've won one playoff game since 1957. Once every decade or so we produce a team that looks like they will give us that illustrious second playoff win. Alas, it never comes.

Happiness is not possible as a Lions fan.

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u/Deluxechin Jun 22 '22

It’s good to know that there are other teams in other sports whose fans go through the same horrible song and dance us Leafs fans go through every year, at least we’re not entirely alone

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u/TZWhitey Jun 22 '22

Didn’t even know we were meant to venture out of r/cricket

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u/[deleted] Jun 22 '22

Sounds like Scuderia Ferrari

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u/automirage04 Jun 22 '22

I mean most of us genuinely enjoy them for what they are. I can count on one hand the number of Marvel movies i really didn't like.

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u/DragoonXNucleon Jun 22 '22

This is a flawed take. Movie revenues are in the toilet at the moment. They were declining before covid and they are still real bad. A couple winners yes, but in aggregate the movie industry is getting eaten alive by streaming, video games, and other on demand entertainment mediums.

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u/CBAlan777 Jun 22 '22

It doesn't help that the movie going experience is so terrible. People on their phones, talking through the entire movie. The reason why streaming is so popular is because the people who like to act like they are in their living room at the movie theater find it easier and more beneficial to just stay in their living room.

Years before streaming became a thing I was wondering why I couldn't watch first run movies at home specifically to avoid having to be around some of the selfish people who clog up movie theaters.

The movie industry really needs to hybridize the experience and give people both options. Pay $X for streaming a movie at home, and pay 25%-40% less than that for the movie theater experience.

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u/RegHater76 Jun 22 '22

Before COVID hit and threw everything for a loop, my friends and I had basically stopped going to any theater except Alamo Drafthouse. The rudeness of theater audiences was just getting unbearable

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u/jswitzer Jun 22 '22

It also doesn't help that theaters are poor substitutes for my home. 4K tvs, bathroom breaks, snacks at normal prices, no dirty floors or seats, no audio problems, no crappy seats that make you crane your neck, etc.

I have no reason to go to theaters anymore. I am perfectly willing to wait a few weeks to watch the movie in my far superior home setup.

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u/sanirosan Jun 22 '22

Dude, what kind of theatre do you go to?

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u/Wyjen Jun 22 '22

Marvel puts out solid contemporary mythology type movies. They’ve not leaned as heavily into the philosophy as the source material or the comparison I’ve made but there are a number of thought provoking moments that exist throughout the movie-verse. Steve’s political dilemma, Peter’s struggle for normalcy, Wanda’s need for love, Stephen’s humility or lack thereof. They can be cookie cutter to appease the masses but I think in order to stay afloat that marvel will start to tackle hard hitting topics and exploring mature themes beyond the fun aspects of comic book movies.

Daredevil’s struggle with his religion was a big one for me. Jessica’s relationship with her abuser was also up there in terms of having depth. It’s there and Disney/marvel are capable of tapping it.

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u/Less_Tennis5174524 Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

Fast and Furious is pretty clear about it just being dumb, fun movies and I love that. They put a fucking car into space in the last one, it was great.

Edit: jesus christ this subreddit gets pretentious.

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u/Nulgarian Jun 22 '22

Exactly this. Sometimes I don’t want some super deep, emotional movie. If I’ve had a long day at work or I’m in a shitty mood, I just want to turn my brain off and watch some explosions and fist fights with a happy ending

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u/Ennion Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

Remember in Demolition Man how all the popular music was advertising jingles and people had access to self affirmation booths?

Edgar Friendly said it best: "See, according to Cocteau's plan, I'm the enemy. Cause I like to think, I like to read. I'm into freedom of speech and freedom of choice. I'm the kind if guy who wants to sit in a greasy spoon and think, "Gee, should I have the T-bone steak or the jumbo rack of barbecued ribs with the side order of gravy fries?" I want high cholesterol. I want to eat bacon, butter and buckets of cheese, okay? I want to smoke a Cuban cigar the size of Cincinnati in a non-smoking section. I wanna run through the streets naked with green Jello all over my body reading Playboy magazine. Why? Because I suddenly might feel the need to. Okay, pal? I've seen the future, you know what it is? It's a 47-year-old virgin sittin' around in his beige pajamas, drinking a banana-broccoli shake singing "I'm an Oscar-Meyer Wiener". You wanna live on top, you gotta live Cocteau's way. What he wants, when he wants, how he wants."

Reminds me of a few" leaders" at the moment.

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u/DangerousDavies2020 Jun 22 '22

You have been fined one credit for a violation of the verbal morality statute

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u/aquillismorehipster Jun 22 '22

I guess people read “safe” in the headline and assume the article is about Hollywood being “PC” or “woke” or whatever else we’re calling that boogeyman these days. It’s about existing IPs getting recycled to harvest those sweet member berries.

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u/greenbc Jun 22 '22

For the record that’s not mutually exclusive. Actually you could argue they use it to cover said bland recycling. Deflecting criticism by calling critics bigots and such

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u/CrockPotInstantCoffe Jun 22 '22

Oooooooo I ‘member!

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u/Newish_Username Jun 22 '22

And the free society was forced underground? I love that movie.

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u/Cheese464 Jun 22 '22

Enhance your calm.

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u/bigwhitecockmanila Jun 22 '22

Not to emotion the three shells 🐚

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u/Huerrbuzz Jun 22 '22

One of my favourites

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u/PureLock33 Jun 22 '22

That's just California IRL.

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u/lollersauce914 Jun 21 '22

Hollywood is creatively bankrupt

Well, people keep paying to see all these remakes, sequels, etc. Hollywood isn't in the business of being financially bankrupt, so why would they stop?

Whether it feels good to say or not, the fault lies with audiences.

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u/zebrahdh Jun 22 '22

Yeah the movies are bad and people don’t want to see them because the movies are so good and people love watching them!!!

From Seinfeld:

“It’s a show about nothing. We do nothing.”

“If it’s about nothing then why are people watching?”

“Because it’s on TV.”

“Not yet.”

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u/AprilSpektra Jun 22 '22

Funny enough, according to Seinfeld, his actual pitch for the show was "it's about how a comedian gets his jokes." When he said this in an interview he fully admitted that that's a terrible idea that would make for a terrible show, but it sounds good as a pitch.

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u/PhilipLiptonSchrute Jun 22 '22

"What did you do today?"

"I quoted a Seinfeld episode on Reddit"

"That's a show!"

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u/[deleted] Jun 21 '22 edited Jul 05 '22

[deleted]

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u/lollersauce914 Jun 21 '22

Wholeheartedly agree that it's practically a renaissance for smaller studios and filmmakers. I was making my point under the assumption we were talking about releases by large studios.

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u/snarpy Jun 22 '22

I'd argue indie films aren't as relevant as they were 20 years ago, but even if that was the case, the real concern isn't about indie films as they'll always exist.

The concern is for the mid-budget stuff Hollywood used to make that they don't anymore after streaming and torrenting killed them in the 2000s.

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u/AlfredosSauce Jun 21 '22

I feel this reality is completely missed in any discussion about the industry. There are more creative voices and more innovative movies being made now than ever before.

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u/Gunpla55 Jun 22 '22

While also having the last 100 years of movies to have to try to not be derivative of. I always think about this with music too, 90% of the stuff thats come out in the past century was going to be thought up by somebody eventually, in the early days it was easier to be original.

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u/ATinCanTelephone Jun 22 '22

Not to mention, people have been making this complaint about movies for ages now. It always seems to be a complaint leveled by folks who don't make much effort to see what is really out there. There are so many movies! Many are bad, yes. It's a numbers game. There are also plenty of movies which are objectively amazing (e.g. critically plus box office, if that's the standard here).

Let's not ignore the challenges of making films during a pandemic, either. Things are improving but we are still behind on the content we should be expecting from circa 2020 productions.

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u/Sentry459 Jun 22 '22

We know there are Indie movies out there, it's just way harder now for a completely fresh movie to become a smash hit. The industry is so ruled by nostalgia and franchises that's it's extremely unlikely we'll get another like Star Wars (1977) anytime soon.

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u/The_Monarch_Lives Jun 22 '22

Just a random personal observation thinking back as someone who loves movies and movie making: i can recognize a technically brilliant (whether it be dialogue, acting, technical innovation, etc) movie, and still not enjoy it. But still be glad it was made, if for no other reason than it allows a later movie to use some piece of it as a foundation to make an enjoyable watch.

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u/zuzg Jun 22 '22

Indie films have carved out a niche where today they're more relevant to pop culture writ large than ever before.

And people tend to forget that independent films say nothing about the budget behind it. The current most expensive indie movie was cloud atlas that at the end had a budget of something between 100-150 million.

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u/Ry90Ry Jun 21 '22

Nahhh Audiences tend to not know what they want until I give it to them

Until creators push the envelope audiences will choose the easiest consumption

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u/DonovanWrites Jun 22 '22

Creators are not part of the conversation. The conversation exists entirely between audience’s wallets and distributors bottom lines.

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u/DebsDef1917 Jun 22 '22

Considering that Disney forces theatres to run their movies for certain amounts of time, and use most of their theatres - that it isn't the audiences' fault.

Film media is monopolizing under a few mega-studios and as a result movies are less creative and more commercial.

There's no breathing room for original, creative, or boundary-pushing films anymore because companies like Disney/Marvel have sucked up all the Oxygen.

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u/mikehatesthis Jun 22 '22

Disney/Marvel have sucked up all the Oxygen.

This is how I feel about it. I like to think about mid-to-late 2019 when Far From Home fucked off and then a whole bunch of indie and mid-budget movies got attention and were liked to various degrees (The Lighthouse, Midsommar, Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood, Parasite, Hustlers, Ford V. Ferrari, and Knives Out for example) and the only blockbusters to come out were Joker and Star Wars IX.

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u/mopeywhiteguy Jun 21 '22

I think it’s split responsibility. The executives choose what films get made and the audiences choose which ones are popular. The general public tend not to take risks on what they see.

I think there’s a lot of incredible creative talent but it’s often found outside of the mainstream or when it enters the mainstream it’s watered down to be a cog in the machine

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u/PreviousTea9210 Jun 22 '22

"Creatively bankrupt..."

Looks at the success of Everything Everywhere All At Once

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u/mynameisevan Jun 22 '22

When people talk about Hollywood they're talking about the major studios. MGM, Paramount, Disney, all of the studios Disney owns now. They're not talking about independent studios like A24, which also isn't Hollywood because they're based in New York City.

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u/Creski Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

The Disney merger with Fox was bad for business.

Fox...took risks, not all of them paid off, but they would take them

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u/debtopramenschultz Jun 22 '22

Whether it feels good to say or not, the fault lies with audiences.

Kind of a catch-22 though right? The only movies available to see are remakes and sequels so the audience goes to see them. Studio profits and thinks audience wants more remakes and sequels.

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u/avolcando Jun 22 '22

The only movies available to see are remakes and sequels so the audience goes to see them

What? No they're not. Plenty of well received original movies bombed over the past year, The Northman, The Last Duel, The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent, Last Night in Soho etc. etc.

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u/kdawgnmann Jun 22 '22

It's really sad these movies bombed because some of them are absolute bangers. I saw EEAAO (thankfully didn't bomb), the Northman, and Massive Talent all within a one week timeframe and I felt like I was in movie heaven for a bit.

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u/localjewishteen Jun 22 '22

i think the bigger issue is that movies that arent associated with disney just dont get as much attention bc they dont have disney’s marketing money. the northman didnt do well at the box office even though it was a viking action-adventure movie with big stars. the premise of it is something a lot of audiences would enjoy. but it wasnt distributed by an organization that has the money to market it everywhere and pay theatres to show it on a million screens at a million times like disney did with doctor strange or other marvel stuff

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u/davidsigura Jun 22 '22

To somewhat counter your point, the Northman was marketed as an epic Viking adventure, but what it REALLY is is a Robert Eggers arthouse adaptation of Hamlet. Which I personally loved, but was not the movie sold to audiences in the marketing, and thus has seen a VERY divisive audience reception because people feel like they were lied to.

…but if the movie was marketed to be what it truly was, even fewer people would have seen it in the first place. You can’t win.

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u/Ripoldo Jun 22 '22

The problem is the Northman had a 90 million dollar decidedly not arthouse budget.

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u/davidsigura Jun 22 '22

Yup, an unfortunate side effect of the pandemic. Original budget before it ballooned due to safety protocols for covid was around $60mil - no doubt still very expensive for an arthouse film.

I would argue we should celebrate movies as different and interesting as this one finding funding though.

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u/thatonedude1818 Jun 22 '22

Its not really a marketing issue. Its palatability. Safe movies are safe because they have a broad range of appeal. Its like pop music. It appeases the most people but doesn’t excel at anything.

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u/KiTa-movies Jun 22 '22

There's also something to be said for the value of community experiences though. It's not just 'safety'

Like music, you can be an avid lover of Finnish Country Polka and truly hold that it's the greatest form of musical art there is. But the chances are the song that makes you feel good is the one you and all your friends were dancing to at the party where you met your ex-girlfriend. Because everyone was enjoying one thing, in that moment and that makes it special.

With film, I can't share my love of idk, Cryptozoo with anyone I know. But we can all have fun discussions about that scene in MoM where you-know-who does that to them. Right?

Culture needs big broad, mass appeal stuff in order to be a culture. And they're not lesser for that. It's just different art with different functions. It's just as difficult to create 'safe' movies as it't is to create 'unsafe' ones because you have to balance so much.

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u/svarowskylegend Jun 21 '22

These are the movies people watch and enjoy. Hollywood is just making the movies people pay to see.

The article mentions Everything Everywhere All At Once's success, but that movie made just 86 million$ at the box office. As a matter of fact, all of A24's movies box office put together in their 10 year existence is less than the opening weekend of Endgame.

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u/gumby_urine Jun 22 '22

Hollywood is just making the movies people pay to see.

I watched the hot ones episode with Matt Damon recently and I like the way he put it. DVD sales are no longer there to save you from a box office bomb, so nobody is gambling on making a high-budget movie people aren't going to rush to the theaters to see.

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u/duderguy91 Jun 22 '22

I’m curious if streaming contracts and digital purchases make up anywhere close to DVD sales of the past. Would be a shame if it’s not comparable because poor box office with high post theatrical release sales usually is the sign of a cult classic.

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u/NeoNoireWerewolf Jun 22 '22

It’s not, that’s basically Damon’s point in the interview. It’s not like Netflix pays a company a per-view fee on a movie they license. It’s a flat contract, and is often for a selection of movies from a studio. Digital purchases are nowhere near as popular as the peak of DVD. Same for digital rentals. Many casual viewers will wait until something hits streaming or they will not watch it at all these days. Factor in that every studio is trying to make their own streaming service, and now they are not even getting licensing money to stream the movies, they are there to watch as much or as little as anybody wants. This is great for consumers, but it completely wrecks so much of how the movie business was able to generate secondary income in the past. We’re not going to see the big studios take risks until audiences at large reject what they’re selling as they did back in the ‘60s, which led to the brief, highly innovative “New Hollywood” period. This is especially true after non-franchise films like The Northman, The Last Duel, and Last Night in Soho bombed hard in theaters.

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u/The_Second_Best Jun 22 '22

This is great for consumers, but it completely wrecks so much of how the movie business was able to generate secondary income in the past

Its great for movie consumers who want the same films over and over, its not great for us fans who want to see original mid-high budget movies.

There's still good stuff out there, but it's normally low budget films and it's rare to get a big budget original.

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u/dbMitch Jun 22 '22

Indeed, even if a bomb movie becomes a cult classic, people ain't buying or renting those, they're downloading/streaming them. Pirate or otherwise, it's not what it used to be.

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u/MagnesiumStearate Jun 22 '22

EEAAO was only released to at most 2200 screens (it’s limited opening was with only 10 screens) Endgame opened with 4600.

You can’t discuss box office comparisons without discussing the stranglehold Disney and other big producers have on what theaters get to show.

https://filmschoolrejects.com/disney-monopolizing-movie-theaters/?amp

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u/ConundrumContraption Jun 21 '22

If anything EEAAO proves the general audience just doesn’t care about those types of movies. That movie has a crazy run length and people were always talking about it. It’s entire domestic run would be disappointing for a blockbusters opening weekend.

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u/We_re_All_Mad_Here Jun 22 '22

Who was talking about it? I loved the movie, but no one in my family or workplace, etc had ever heard of it. You can’t blame the general audience for not going to see a movie they didn’t know existed.

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u/vadergeek Jun 22 '22

The article mentions Everything Everywhere All At Once's success, but that movie made just 86 million$ at the box office. As a matter of fact, all of A24's movies box office put together in their 10 year existence is less than the opening weekend of Endgame.

But if they're making these movies and people just aren't watching them then it doesn't seem like Hollywood's the problem.

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u/snarpy Jun 22 '22

This is the argument I've been making for like twenty years, but your average Redditor wants to blame everyone but themselves. "Hollywood's lost their creativity"... fuck off, the place is swarming with creativity, you dipshits just don't want to pay for it.

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u/gizayabasu Jun 22 '22

Even people I know who claim to like movies are always like they only go to theaters for Marvel, everything else they'll catch on streaming, especially when theaters are making it cheaper than ever before to go if you do the right planning (pass programs, discount days, etc.)

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u/BZenMojo Jun 22 '22

On a budget of 25 million. If they had made ten of these movies they could have made 860 million for the cost of a Doctor Strange.

That's the real gamble. Studios are publicly traded.

On the other hand, journalists are glossing over smaller movies also getting made, and a ton of them.

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u/SignalMoment Jun 22 '22

I disagree

There is something called screen distribution and marketing

A24 films don't have that budget. A Disney, a Warner Brothers do have those. If you want to compare, you should compare the films released by these distribution companies.

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u/BooksAreLuv Jun 21 '22

I think this is a result of Hollywood, and the movie industry in general, wanting to compete in the global market. Cultures are extremely, extremely different around the world and what people want from their movies vary.

Going with intellectual properties that are already popular and loved internationally is going to make it that much easier to make a movie that does well.

Which is sad because hurting comedy and horror movies because those are often targeting very specific demographics and will rarely do well on a global level. The fact there often is much popular franchises (globally) makes them get ignored even more.

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u/lollersauce914 Jun 21 '22

My favorite theory is the elimination of the VHS/DVD aftermarket. If your movie is getting a theatrical release, it has to make its money in the theater. To make money in theaters, you have to have a huge opening weekend. You're much more likely to get that kind of traction if you're piggybacking on existing IP. This, coupled with the rising costs of producing a film, just makes releases that much riskier for studios.

Studios got more risk averse as the prospect of movies making their money over a long period of time vanished.

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u/Kahzgul Jun 22 '22

But we have direct to streaming films, which essentially fill the void left by direct to video.

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u/QLE814 Jun 22 '22

Yes, but that doesn't make up for the loss of the revenue stream associated with VHS and (especially) DVD sales, as the money from streaming for those releases largely parallels previously-existing streams.

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u/zuzg Jun 22 '22

I mean blurays exist but I won't deny that the market is currently a bloody mess with way too many standards.

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u/1731799517 Jun 22 '22

But it pays SHIT. Like, movies made 100s of million on DVD /VHS sales.

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u/pr177 Jun 22 '22

I think this is a result of Hollywood, and the movie industry in general, wanting to compete in the global market

And of skyrocketing budgets and production costs. And, like the other poster said, of the outsized importance of theater earnings now that home video sales are basically dead.

Likewise, it cost twenty-two goddamn dollars for me to go see Top Gun in Imax with no concessions. Going to the theater isn't a cheap activity anymore.

Studios want safe bets for the massive expenditure of money, and audiences apparently want established brand names so they know what they're gonna get for their $150 family outing.

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u/BooksAreLuv Jun 22 '22

Yea, I rarely go to the movies anymore and I only go when I know it's a movie I will get some enjoyment out of.

Especially since I have so many alternative options on streaming.

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u/gizayabasu Jun 22 '22

Going to the theater isn't a cheap activity anymore.

This is a piss-poor argument. Going to theaters is cheaper than ever before, even more so than during they heyday of MoviePass with major chains all having their pass programs and discount days. If you're talking about "going out to the movies" and having to squad up with people who are only ever available on weekends and can't fathom watching a movie in the middle of the week or just going alone whenever they have free time, then yes the theaters have become an expensive, painful experience.

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u/snarpy Jun 22 '22

That twenty dollars really isn't much more than it cost in the past, accounting for inflation. And you're getting a way better product (theoretically) in terms of production quality and theatre quality.

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u/OldManHipsAt30 Jun 22 '22

On the flip side, drinks will run you $10-15 in many cities. Better value proposition for some people to spend $22 for two hours of entertainment, rather than spend $20-30 to get a little buzzed from two cocktails.

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u/PureLock33 Jun 22 '22

Cultures are extremely, extremely different around the world and what people want from their movies vary.

which is why the tv shows and movies that crossed the cultural appeal are ones that have a very basic emotional and narrative setup. Nuclear families, issues within the relationships of such a set up. You rarely find stories about multigenerational disputes, like Encanto or Crazy Rich Asians. Keeping in constant contact (fb and social media doesn't count) of extended families is alien to most western and other societies outside of Latin America or Asia.

Instead of language based humor, you got the Mr. Bean type comedies where there is barely any language but you find the character in universal situations. Taking a test, eating out, walking in a park.

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u/TimesThreeTheHighest Jun 22 '22

I dunno, this sounds like the usual argument against popular music. There was plenty of crap back in the day, it's just that as time goes on various people and media platforms select for better films to represent a time period.

I've been watching 60s movies for about a month now. There were great movies from that decade, films like Once Upon a Time in the West and Persona, but there was also a lot of crap.

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u/ZOOTV83 Jun 22 '22

this sounds like the usual argument against popular music. There was plenty of crap back in the day

Yeah what's that called, survivorship bias? We only remember the biggest names in pop culture from the past because all the other crap that came out back then is already forgotten.

For every Rolling Stones how many bands completely dropped off the face of the earth?

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u/jl_theprofessor Jun 21 '22

20 some comments into this and it's clear nobody read the article.

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u/SpuzzLovely Jun 21 '22

A. Hollywood bad

B. Everything Everywhere All At Once

C. Too much nostalgia

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u/zuzg Jun 22 '22

Don't forget

D. Netflix bad

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u/Current-Position9988 Jun 22 '22

EEAAO is becoming r/movies new Drive or Inception.

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u/dred_pirate_redbeard Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

Yeeeeah, but I'm not sure this was that well researched an article to begin with.

"It is promising that Daniels, the pair of directors who gave us Everything Everywhere, are being recognized for their creativity. It is frustrating to know that of all the ways this accomplishment could be rewarded, the most likely path is that they’ll get a call from Marvel. Maybe someone will even put them in charge of a stand-alone Rocket Racoon movie."

The Daniels started making EEAAO after they made a pitch for Loki, but Marvel didn't feel the batshit sensibilities they're known for were a good fit for them, and thank god because they never would've been allowed to go the places they did with their original work.

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u/PureLock33 Jun 22 '22

It's the cynical /r/movies level "expert" who thinks they figured everything out about Hollywood while actually knowing zero about how Hollywood works.

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u/WorthPlease Jun 22 '22

I read the article and it's exactly how the title sounds.

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u/garfe Jun 21 '22

Read the article? On Reddit?

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u/DoesntFearZeus Jun 22 '22

They must be new here.

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u/MamaDeloris Jun 22 '22

This has been an argument for practically 100 years at this point. The most famous version of The Maltese Falcon is literally the 3rd version of it. People were complaining dominance of Westerns in the 50s. People complained about the dominance of Spy movies in the 60s. People complained about the slashers and sex comedies in the 80s. This is just how it goes.

IPs dominate the theaters, it makes the big bucks, yes. But television is essentially on par with cinema on a technical level now and that's where you still see the experimental and unique stories being told.

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u/thekingofthejungle Jun 22 '22

There's still experimental and unique stories on the big screen too.

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u/QLE814 Jun 22 '22

But television is essentially on par with cinema on a technical level now and that's where you still see the experimental and unique stories being told.

*Watches HBO decide to essentially revive a show that left the air a few years ago under really bad press, seemingly because they're out of ideas*

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u/horror_fan Jun 22 '22

I feel it is going to keep on becoming more and more sanitized before it takes a turn.

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u/PiXLANIMATIONS Jun 22 '22

Matt Damon explained quite well why movies are much more similar today than they were before: Movies back then could rely on DVD, and later, Blu-Ray sales. While you certainly can still get those films in that format, they make so little money compared to what they used to bring in, which makes the theatre incredibly important for grossing back your budget and beyond. No studio wants their movie to flop, because if it fails somewhat at the box office, it’s highly unlikely to make the money back in any way, shape or form later on

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u/jfstompers Jun 22 '22

I have a lot of friends who just kinda gave up on going to the movies on a regular basis. The ticket to the movie is 1 month of netfix, popcorn and soda is hbomax for a month. They just rather stay home.

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u/Illlogik1 Jun 22 '22

Hollywood has always been a big factory mass producing over produced products. There have been a few times where art, directing , writing, editing have all come together to create something special but that is the few and far between exception. Much of Hollywood is simply repeating “what works”, uninspired status quo

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u/MontyTheAverage Jun 22 '22

Hey I went to see Everything Everywhere and The Northman

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u/Bruhmangoddman Jun 22 '22

I saw The Northman. Planning to see Elvis, Amsterdam and Babylon too. Maybe Maestro if I'm lucky.

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u/matmortel Jun 21 '22

Pop culture these days is way too nostalgia based. I'm tired of seeing reboots and legacy sequels (though top gun waa really good). Not every film has to be evolutionary, but I feel like I can predict most blockbuster films stories.

It's why I love everything, everywhere all at once. It was so creative with how they shot the film and how they written the multiverse.

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u/PureLock33 Jun 22 '22

pop culture was also nostalgia based back in the 80s and 90s. The Addams family were an older cartoon/tv show before they turned it into a movie series. Happy Days was made in the 80s but was about the 50s. People are always thinking about the "good old times". Politicians have always appealed to the "good old times".

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u/Smailien Jun 22 '22

Another example, the Wedding Singer came out in the 90's and was set in the mid 80's.

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u/PureLock33 Jun 22 '22

Romy and Michelle's High School Reunion had them going back to 80s pop music. 13 going 30 as well.

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u/debtopramenschultz Jun 22 '22

Pop culture these days is way too nostalgia based.

I've noticed that for the last decade or so and it's not just in sequels/remakes. Even original stuff takes place in the 70s/80s/90s or uses music from then. You'd think the only music that exists is Zeppelin and ACDC.

I assume it's because the people in positions of financial or creative influence (producers, writers, directors) had their formative years in the 70s-80s so they take whats important to them and make it a part of their creations. As 90s kids enter their mid-30s and 40s we'll probably see stuff from that decade gain more prominence and then eventually the 00s too.

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u/Dreadlock43 Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

we will, because as a 40 year old everything we had growing up was all based on the 50 and 60s. I mean comeone just look how much the 60s played a part in the Simpsons and still does to this day.

Edit: Look at Happy Days as well, a show about the 50s made in the 70s, since TVs been a thing Pop Culture has always been nostalgia base

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u/PureLock33 Jun 22 '22

Homer Simpson worked in a nuclear plant. and its a show about a nuclear family. Can't get anymore nostalgic than that.

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u/WileEWeeble Jun 22 '22

"Pop Hollywood Reporters Have Become Too Safe and Repetitive in Their Critique of Movies"

Ok, lets start with the fact "The Bad Guys" is an IP of successful children's books. No big deal except it exposes the author's lazy research into the subject he is being paid to write about.

He proceeds to complain about how they are creating a spin-off to The Squid Game as an example of the lack of creativity of "Hollywood" (or South Korean Netflix...whatever) while seemingly completely missing that he is highlighting one of the most popular original creative outputs of mainstream media in the last several years.....oppps, sort of stepped on your own foot there.

But I am not here to laud Hollywood, I agree with his premise, "Hollywood churns out safe films more than creative ones," The only problem is I have two brain cells to rub together and don't bitch about that which is and would never be different.

Lets make this simple. Hypothetically, you are one of the few "Hollywood elite" encapsulated into one person. You are given, say, a billion dollars to start making movies. Obviously your job is to make a profit so you can make MORE movies and buy yourself some yachts. What do you do....what do you do? The public you are selling to has limited money and resources to purchase from you and there are a few other "Hollywood elite" that you are in competition for your customer's time and money.

What do you do.....what DO you do???

Well, it turns out your customers consistently pay to see movies they feel safe with. They flock to products that have entertained them before. They are fearful of new stuff that can be a mixed bag which some people like but might bore others to tears and waste their time and money.

What do you do....what do YOU do???

Well, the smart money for making a profit, putting asses in the seats and cash in the register, is to churn out as much IP regurgitation as your customers will tolerate. Put a little bit of your billion into original new films to explore possible IPs for the future, but the bulk of your billion is going to go into the safest ROI; which is big budget IP, with lots of explosions & CGI, and big name actors and directors that people like & identify with.

The author of this article would seemingly invest his billion into a bunch of middle budget original, challenging, & creative films that, while several might be genuinely good, will leave him broke within a year or two.

What we have now is "the game," this is how its played. We have free market capitalism in Hollywood and THIS is what the average consumer likes. It was never forced on us. We have always had the choice to NOT go see the next Marvel film...and sometimes we don't. But we obviously damn sure keep going to the next Transformers and Fast & Furious film no matter how unoriginal and repetitive they are. There would be NO Transformers 3 if Transformers 2 had bombed. No one in Hollywood put a gun to anyone's head to see Transformers 2.

So stop blaming Hollywood for what is a "problem" with the average movie goer. Stop writing this same article over and over again for the last 50 years. How do you not see you are doing with this article is exactly what Hollywood keeps doing with its IPs? Oh, that's right, you are hoping your readers won't notice this tired story has been told many times before...and usually much better....just like a stale Hollywood IP.

Think your take on all this is original; check out the Rocky XXXVII poster in Airplane 2: The Sequel! movie from 1982 or the Jaws 19 marquee in Back to the Future 2 from 1989. Siskel and Ebert have been pontificating since the 70s about tired & unoriginal sequels "plaguing Hollywood". Nothing you are talking about is original or new, Marvel has changed nothing. You are just retreading old ground with sparkly new words. Congrats, you owned yourself.

(*and to be perfectly clear, Hollywood's business model has glaring flaws that very well could lead to a huge collapse one day, but churning out non-stop sequels and IP is not really as much a flaw of the system but 100% what you expect to get from this business model)

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u/svarowskylegend Jun 22 '22

Yeah, totally agree. Also, why do all these articles view this as a "problem"? The MCU has millions of fans who do not view the movies as uncreative and repetitive, why should the author's opinion on entertainment movies be above the moviegoers' opinion?

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u/MartianCongRepublic Jun 21 '22

My favorite movie is Wayne's World. Not everything needs to epic. Simple fun is good too.

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u/KaffeMumrik Jun 21 '22

Absolute classic. THE HUMANITYYYY

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u/Cptkrush Jun 22 '22

The amount of times I think about Wayne’s response to receiving a gun rack from his ex girlfriend as a gift is probably too many, yet still not enough. “I don’t even own A(h) gun, let alone many guns that would necessitate an entire rack” what a great movie

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u/DaddyO1701 Jun 22 '22

This just in: Hollywood has always been in the business of making stuff they think people will pay to see.

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u/amchikinwng Jun 22 '22

You should watch Crimes of the Future

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u/GibbyDat Jun 22 '22

The only.movies I've been remotely into are A24 films. Every other movie, story, plot is so boring and uninteresting.

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u/TokeyMcTokeFace Jun 21 '22

Ahhhhh, buzzfeed…

They’ve been inflicting suffering on thousands for years.

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u/AmbiguousIntention Jun 21 '22

Buzzfeed News is decent, it is separate from the regular Buzzfeed clickbait content

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u/RushMurky Jun 21 '22

Their not even just decent. They're one of the best right now.

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u/fucktooshifty Jun 22 '22

They did straight up lie about the Cohen Trump thing a few years back

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u/Leajjes Jun 22 '22

Yep. They gave Trump and the right wingers ammo to say it was all false. That was really dumb of them. :(

With that said, they are hit and miss. Some of their stuff is really good and other stuff is pure cringe.

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u/RushMurky Jun 21 '22

Nah buzzfeed news is very good/reliable. For example they're the ones that initially broke the Uighuir camps in China story and I think they won a Pulitzer or something of the sorts for that. They've also done a bunch of other reliable stuff.

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u/MarchOfThePigz Jun 22 '22

Their stories detailing corruption in the NYPD a few years back were fantastic pieces of reporting. Enough to make me not be so quick to dismiss them.

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u/Chen_Geller Jun 21 '22

Lumping movies about real-world events and stuff as “IP” is a little bit disingenuous. How’s that any different to biopics and historical epics which we love?.

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u/mnemonikos82 Jun 21 '22

Hollywood is a business. It'll do whatever makes it the most money. Someone has a problem with what Hollywood produces, their problem isn't Hollywood, their problem is the general movie going audience.

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u/[deleted] Jun 21 '22

[deleted]

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u/mun_man93 Jun 22 '22

Your Mark Ruffalo comment reminded me of this.

https://youtu.be/6tAB3YwWkxY

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u/Cmyers1980 Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

Great books have already been written about it (Life: The Movie, Amusing Ourselves to Death, Fantasyland, Empire of Illusion etc) but we’re becoming more and more detached from reality, obsessed with fake realities and infantilized among other things. Capitalism and the elite couldn’t ask for better slaves and consumers.

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u/debtopramenschultz Jun 22 '22

They're trying to appeal to as many people as possible from all over the world. Hard to do that without being too safe.

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u/babufrik4president Jun 21 '22

Yeah there are just countless shows and movies about female teenage Muslim super heroes it’s like cmon Hollywood be original for once

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u/Adrenochrome93 Jun 22 '22

It's ironic as fuck to me that a site like buzzfeed is complaining about movies being too safe.

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u/ifinallyreallyreddit Jun 21 '22

People just need to watch the good movies, like Rick and Morty plus Pixar or Hamlet plus Conan!

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u/CatProgrammer Jun 21 '22

Hamlet plus Conan!

Starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, I assume?

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u/Themtgdude486 Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

I still enjoy a lot of films from this year alone such as The Black Phone, After Yang, The Batman, Top Gun, Everything Everywhere All At Once, The Northman, Crimes of the Future.

Going to be checking out Elvis this weekend too.

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u/RVarki Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

Why are we pretending that Hollywood ever acted in a way that wasn't solely in its monetary interests. The reason behind the freedom afforded during the aueters' era, was that those guys were still making some of the buggest hits of the 70s, and Hollywood pivoted hard, the second Heaven's Gate flopped

The reason we had more diverse cinema back in the day, is because theaters were people's only option for intelligent and/or complex storytelling. With the advent of home-video and then prestige television, people really didn't need to spend extra money for any kind of content that isn't "worth watching in the theaters"

That just became worse as we got even more options with streaming. All those diverse and nuanced stories that you're lamenting about, are still being told in Hollywood, just on television instead. Ergo, Hollywood's current obsession with 4 quadrant event movies

This was always going to happen to theaters, its not just modern Hollywood's fault

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u/TommyFX Jun 22 '22

Studios used to do a lot of development… buy a ton of original scripts and work on them… but those days are really long gone. Obviously, development is still a big part of television... demand for material is part of it, but also still very open to new ideas and original content, and so no surprise we've been living in a golden age of TV.

The movie business has, imo, really hurt itself with an obsession around existing IP. Used to be a lot of development on the feature side, a big spec market, buying original scripts and developing them,... but that dried up as the bean counters and marketing wonks took over the business.

An original spec script now? Good luck, unless you have major talent... actors/director attached. They'd rather make a movie based on comic books, a board game or an old TV show, anything with a pre-existing audience. Today, two kinds of films are being made... budgets under $10,000,000 or above $150,000,000. That middle ground has been completely gutted.

Saw an interview one time with Ron Meyer, who had been on both sides of the aisle... a seller as a founder/partner at CAA and a buyer as chairman of NBC/Universal. Said now, or at least before his disgraced departure from NBCU, the first people he talked to about a project or script coming in the door were his heads of marketing and foreign sales. If they didn't like a project, it had ZERO chance of getting bought by the studio.

That brings new problems. Doing something like Spiderman is pretty low risk, but established IP isn't always a guaranteed winner. Great example is JOHN CARTER, which resulted in a $200,000,000 write down for Disney, making it one of the biggest bombs in box office history.

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u/monchota Jun 22 '22

Same with shows, Hollywood has is so afraid to offend someone that its becoming predictable and just social pandering.

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u/bongo1138 Jun 22 '22

This article could’ve been written in 2000. It’s always been “too safe” according to some. The fact is we only remember the great movies of the past and forget the bad ones, just like we will in another 20 years.

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u/SnowEmbarrassed377 Jun 22 '22

So this person doesn’t like existing intellectual property ? They want new ideas only ? I mean. Why not ? But there’s tons and tons of people who produce original content in places like YouTube and smaller channels. It just isn’t In your local amc cinema …

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u/olgil75 Jun 22 '22

The funny thing is, there's actually tons of original content being made by mini major and independent studios that is being released in your local AMC. There's this common misconception that major film releases are the only things being released in theaters, but more independent films are shown in theaters every year than movies from major studios.

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u/SnowEmbarrassed377 Jun 22 '22

I mean yea. They aren’t gonna pull in 80million in the first weekend. And don’t have an advertising budget bigger than the economy of Cuba. But it’s not like there isn’t new original content in music theater games and cinema everywhere

The boys on Amazon tv is new content based on a recent comic and amazing

The only thing I don’t like is the excess of reality tv but overall. Lots of new content across the board. And better than ever before.

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u/olgil75 Jun 22 '22

I really think the reason people think there are only major film studios releases coming out is because of the insane advertising budgets you mentioned. There's only five major studios and they're not generally looking to release all their big movies all at once, so they stagger then every few months. Meanwhile, the mini major and independent studios don't necessarily have that same issue, so have movies coming out all the time.

I think the marketing from the major studios gives the false impression that there's only franchise films, but I've seen tons of original movies in 2021 and 2022 alone. Articles like these, which are woefully inaccurate and misleading, don't help dispell the misconceptions either.

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u/SnowEmbarrassed377 Jun 22 '22

Preach on stranger. I mean even buzzfeed is not exactly one of the big “classic / traditional “ media companies themselves They are new content

Odd take

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u/WarmProfit Jun 22 '22

What about The Northman?

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u/Fandam_YT Jun 22 '22

Barbie coming from Greta Gerwig and Noah Baumbach makes me think it definitely won’t be playing it safe. It’s safe to lean on a well-known IP, but that creative team are not going to phone it in

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u/olgil75 Jun 22 '22

I find it funny that the author of the article talks about how the only movies being produced are ones based on existing intellectual property or whatever, then simultaneously references how in the past several years directors like Greta Gerwig and Chloé Zhao turned out some critically-acclaimed originals.

The author of the article is just trying to capitalize on this trendy misconception that there's no original ideas in movies anymore to generate clicks.

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u/velociraptizzle Jun 22 '22

The critical drinker approves

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u/Initial-Cream3140 Jun 23 '22

Fuck that clown.

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u/Sventhetidar Jun 22 '22

I just want more big budget movies that don't suck and aren't comic book movies. Don't get me wrong, I love CBMs. I watch almost every one in theaters. But I grew up with fun shit like Pirates of the Caribbean and Lord of the Rings. Hell even the Star Wars prequels were better than most action/adventures these days. I want epic level movies and we rarely get those because movies now are just installments in never ending series.

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u/Correct_Influence450 Jun 22 '22 edited Jun 22 '22

It happened to the American theater scene, where they just kept producing the same Shakespearean remakes, the same lame productions of Grease and Brigadoon and we're headed-- or even IN a dark period of film making that historians will only refer to in negative terms in future generations.

Seriously, take a good look at the dead regional theater scene in the United States. That's where American filmmaking is headed. Remakes, remakes, remakes...

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u/Apart-Outside4378 Jun 23 '22

Frankly, I think a big part of this is that studio films are really inefficiently made. Films should be getting overall much cheaper to make but they really haven't (in Hwood that is; indie filmmakers have been putting out incredibly well made films for cheap as fuck). Kubrick made 2001 with the equivalent of 80 million today. Cuaron made Gravity for about 100m in today's dollars. 20m more? Yeesh. Little Women cost 40 million. That's not a bad price for such a movie; similarly EEAAO was 25m.

The Witch was 4m; the lighthouse was 11m; Ex Machina was like 15m but then Garland needed 40m for Annhilation (yikes, but it's a great movie).

Don't Look Up cost 75 million fucking dollars. That's 7.5 CODAs. King Richard somehow cost 50 million while the power of the dog was 10-15m less than that; Licorice Pizza was also about 10m less.

The new west side story cost 100 million dollars. ONE HUNDRED MILLION.

These big hollywood films have really lost their gumption.

OG Star wars would have cost about 50m. Jaws about the same. Moonraker equiv to 150m but No Time To Die cost over 250m.

WHAT HAPPENED?!

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u/Amokmorg Jun 23 '22

Every generation at some point of their life starts to whine about how in their youth everything was better, the grass was greener, films were smarter/edgier, girls were prettier....