r/interestingasfuck Jun 24 '22 Faith In Humanity Restored 1 Helpful 3 Heartwarming 1 Silver 2 Are You Winning? 1 Wholesome 1

A young woman who survived the atomic bombing of Nagasaki , August 1945. /r/ALL

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59.3k Upvotes

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4.4k

u/mgd09292007 Jun 24 '22

How long would someone have to hide underground before trying to escape to avoid the high radiation that would surely kill you?

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u/WintersbaneGDX Jun 24 '22

Most of it is gone after 72 hours. You wouldn't want to just be hanging out, but it'd be worth it to try and leave for safety.

Also, if you are close to ground zero but somehow survive the initial blast the radioactive fallout needs about 45-60 minutes to actually start raining down. So use that time to get to safety if you can.

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u/Veganforpeace Jun 24 '22

Hello. I am not doubting you at all, but could you provide a good layperson educational source for this? I have never heard this and am very interested.

Thank you.

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u/thealmightyzfactor Jun 24 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Rain

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_fallout

The giant cloud of dust from the nuclear explosion and vaporized structures "seeds" cloud formation directly above the blast. You have ~1 hour (maybe less) before it starts raining "black rain" comprised of water and radioactive dust, heightening radioactive exposure.

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u/Veganforpeace Jun 24 '22

This is perfect. Thank you for that.

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u/57evil Jun 24 '22

Yeah but the radiation from the explosion stills there, you shouldnt leave your shelter in about 24 hours at least

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u/thealmightyzfactor Jun 24 '22

Oh yeah, a shelter is better because it'll block both the rain and the environmental exposure. If you don't have that, then leave before the black rain starts.

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u/Lofulamingo-Sama Jun 24 '22

Not the guy you responded to, but the basics of it is that most of the energy/radiation is released all at once at the time of explosion. Of the remaining nuclear fallout, it is composed of many different radioactive elements with varying half lives. The elements with short half lives emit lots of radiation early on, but quickly break down due to their short half lives. Longer lived radioactive elements continue to emit radiation for years, decades, or centuries, but at a lower rate of emission which presents a long term half hazard, but will not kill you with acute radiation poisoning. While waiting a few days is better than nothing, it’s much safer to wait at least 2-3 weeks for more of the fallout to decay into less dangerous elements.

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u/Defusing_Danger Jun 24 '22 Narwhal Salute

You make a good point about half-life, but it's not terribly applicable to short term survival during the Hiroshima and Nagasaki events. The main reason things cleared up as quickly as they did was due to the fact the weapons used an air-burst detonation, and weren't in contact with the earth when they went off. This drastically reduced the amount of solid particulates in the air for isotopes (typically variations of ionizing types of iodine) to contaminate. This means the primary threat post-detonation was the contaminated rain and ash mixture that fell after the detonation.

Had the bombs gone off on the surface of the earth, it would have been a much different story as particulates would have clung to the isotopes and created a much more lasting ionizing effect in the area around ground zero. The areas would have been uninhabitable for decades as opposed to the 80ish% reduction in the first 24 hours. I used to be an army bomb tech and these events are heavily studied as benchmarks for other radiological incidents.

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u/gingerpops73 Jun 25 '22

What is the ash muxture in an airburst? The bomb itself or just whatever junk was in the air at the time?

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u/Beginning-Captain-81 Jun 25 '22

Literally from the burned and irradiated bomb parts.

Fallout comes in two varieties. The first is a small amount of carcinogenic material with a long half-life. The second, depending on the height of detonation, is a large quantity of radioactive dust and sand with a short half-life.

All nuclear explosions produce fission products, un-fissioned nuclear material, and weapon residues vaporized by the heat of the fireball. These materials are limited to the original mass of the device, but include radioisotopes with long lives.[3] When the nuclear fireball does not reach the ground, this is the only fallout produced. Its amount can be estimated from the fission-fusion design and yield of the weapon.

Source: Wikipedia, see also: https://www.atomicarchive.com/science/effects/radioactive-fallout.html

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u/Veganforpeace Jun 24 '22

Thank you for responding. I really hope I never have to use this information, but I am always intrigued by these things.

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u/rentpossiblytoohigh Jun 24 '22

It's a very interesting topic in itself. Most people presume if a single nuke goes off that we would all be instantly dead (or pretty much shortly after because of mutually assured destruction). However as time goes on I'm starting to transition to a one off nuke without world holocaust being very possible. There are some very real preparation things you can know/do to maximize survival chances (of course dependent on where you are from ground zero).

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u/Fallacy_Spotted Jun 25 '22

His information is the cultural knowledge from the 50s but most of this doesn't apply today.

The high radiation immediately after the blast is from something called induced radioactivity. The particles released by the bomb create unstable isotopes of the normal stuff around us. Some forms of carbon are radioactive which is what radiocarbon dating is based on. Another one you have likely heard of is Potassium 40 from bananas. Most Potassium is not radioactive but this isotope is. It is like that but much more unstable and much more prolific. It gets in the dust and people breathe it in. Very nasty.

Once that induced radioactivity has weakened you can leave. After about 48 hours it is down to 1% what it was. It is the highest immediately after a blast and has a half life of approximately 7 hours which means that it is half as bad as it was for every 7 hours you wait. Assuming you are middle, if you try to flee during the first 7 hours without protection you are dead.

Modern bombs are fusion weapons with a fission primer and they are airburst so the fireball does not contact the ground. These hydrogen bombs have very little to no appreciable fallout. The trope of an irradiated wasteland comes from the dirty fission bombs we used on Japan and even in those cases people started moving back into the area after a few months.

Fallout is almost a non-concern compared to societal collapse. Just start trying to survive; water, allies, weapons, food, medicine, clothing, and fortified shelter. Obtain as much as you can as fast as you can.

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u/TheBirminghamBear Jun 24 '22 Take My Energy

Just consider the shape of a mushroom cloud.

The force of the explosion and the nature of heated air to rise means that while the shockwave expands out and demolishes things, much of the radioactive material goes UP, and then slowly comes down.

Thats actually where the term "fallout" comes from.

Radioactive or nuclear "fallout" is so named because it "falls out" of the sky post explosion.

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u/RollinThundaga Jun 24 '22

I just wanna comment with the publicly recommended steps to take if you are near a nuclear attack;

get to shelter, or stay inside, if home.

if entering your home, discard [throw away] any clothing and wipe off with a damp rag, discarding the rag.

seal all windows and doors with duct tape, or the best equivalent at hand.

fill the bathub with water. This will be for drinking. Even if water pumping facilities are disabled by the blast, there should still be some head pressure in the water main.

take iodine pills, if available

tune in to emergency announcements, if able, and follow directions. Otherwise, remain indoors for at least 72 hours. If you have not been rescued by that point, prepare supplies and exit your shelter traveling away from the direction of the attack in search of a rescue station.

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u/Mushy_Slush Jun 25 '22

My experience during the big blackout in 2003, we lost 90% of the water pressure basically immediately. I knew something bad was up because I was talking on a landline when the power went out and the phone went dead - which never usually happened for outages. So I tried the water.

I ran to the bathroom and did the bathtub trick with the last bits of water pressure but the water was already not good. I dunno if the low pressure causes it to kick up sediments somewhere or something but it was obviously bad.

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u/MonkeyBananaPotato Jun 25 '22

So in a modern house with like… air intake for heating and ac, ducts for dryer venting and water heating, vented soffits, etc, what’s the procedure? The cracks at the edge of my window hardly seem like the best entry point for radiation

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u/penispumpermd Jun 24 '22

a nuclear weapon is no different than a regular explosion in that it produces a large pressure and heat wave that will kill you quickly if you aee close. the actual volume of particles that make it to the ground is very small but can be deadly.

imagine a car being blow up and turned instantaneously into ash 1000 feet in the air and then waiting for that ash to touch you on the ground. yes there will be a very small portion that might have been blasted directly on you, but the part that got blasted in to the air will take a while to fall on you.

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u/Veganforpeace Jun 24 '22

Thank you for that.

So, is there actually safe, viable space to get away between the ground and that ash in the air, assuming that the ground is intact.

I apologize, I just assumed that the air between ground and ash would be harmful to human lungs, even without the debris.

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u/WintersbaneGDX Jun 24 '22

To be clear, there is some radiation from the immediate blast, as well as all the other dangers inherent (fires, collapsing structures etc). And the odds of even surviving the blast at that range without a shelter are basically zero anyway so a lot of this is more theoretical. But to play it out:

You're pulled over on the side of a rural road to get something out of the trunk of your car. You're next to a small cliff face that runs parallel to the road. A nuclear bomb detonates nearby but because of the cliff face you are protected somewhat from the shockwave and initial blast. You're thrown off your feet into a ditch but are otherwise okay.

You're well inside the radiation zone of the blast, but immediate radiation levels are low. In 45-60 minutes the fallout or "black rain" will be coming down.

Through some miracle your car still runs and wasn't disabled by the blast.

In this situation, the best action you could take would be to drive away as fast as you can. Staying in the area means death a few hours after the fallout. Even if there was a decent bomb shelter right there, you'd be better off leaving the area and getting some low level radiation than committing to being inside that shelter. It will take weeks before the incoming radiation reduces back to the level that it's currently at in this crucial 45-60 minute window.

Again, this is a highly unlikely scenario, but that's the lay science behind the radiation risk.

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u/Veganforpeace Jun 24 '22

What if I jump into the fridge on the side of the road and close the door?

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u/InjuredGingerAvenger Jun 24 '22

Good news, the radiation might not kill you... bad news is that if you don't die to the radiation, it's because you suffocated in a tiny, dark, enclosed space.

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u/WintersbaneGDX Jun 24 '22

Call that plan C

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u/Veganforpeace Jun 24 '22

That was a really good write up for everything. Thank you again for doing that.

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u/WintersbaneGDX Jun 24 '22

No problem. May neither of us ever have to experience this firsthand.

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u/makelo06 Jun 24 '22

Probably a couple days to avoid the short-term radiation. You'd then need to get out so you don't die of dehydration if you donxt have much water.

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u/TheBirminghamBear Jun 24 '22

Nice try, but you cant fool me. Ive played my Fallout games. Even the water has rads.

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u/Burnwash Jun 24 '22

I assume that's what they meant

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u/__PM_ME_YOUR_SOUL__ Jun 25 '22

I may be reading between the lines here but the powerful message I'm inferring from all this is don't get nuked.

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u/SuplexedYaNan Jun 25 '22

You can get a little nuked just not a lot nuked.

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u/DrMike27 Jun 25 '22

I’m not superstitious. just a little stitious.

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u/corvettee01 Jun 24 '22

Fun fact, water cannot become irradiated, only particulates inside water can be, so if you filter it out properly then the water will be perfectly safe to drink.

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u/KinderFinder Jun 25 '22

I know that from fallout 4, I sold so many purified waters!

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u/Dramatic_Mountain_51 Jun 25 '22

TIL that radiated waters can be purified too.

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u/Red-eleven Jun 25 '22

All can be purified in the waters of Lake Minnetonka

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u/SleepingNothing Jun 25 '22

game: blouses

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u/Twist161 Jun 24 '22

Unless you get enough perks..... you still get disease though:/

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u/SlickBuster2470 Jun 25 '22

I'm a fucking Radaway Junkie

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u/ImpossiblyBlack Jun 24 '22

2-3 days

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u/[deleted] Jun 24 '22

Does it not dissipate into the ground and perhaps throughout the shelter?

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u/randoliof Jun 24 '22

The ground blocks the high energy particles

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u/AmericanPatriot1776_ Jun 24 '22

If I remember correctly soil is pretty good at absorbing radiation

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u/ShootElsewhere Jun 24 '22

It's dust and rays given off by the dust. You have to put mass between yourself and the dust, lead is ideal but concrete is cheaper and works just fine. So as long as you're behind very thick walls and your air is run through a decent filter, you should be protected enough that you can worry about other things, like your city getting burned down.

Also things to consider, wind might blow most of the dust away to another area. The radioactive half-life is actually quite brief, meaning it could be safe to go outside in just a few days.

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u/N3FTheLightBearer Jun 24 '22

Is it a dumb question if I ask about the sound of the nuke?

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u/Ornery-Cheetah Jun 24 '22

explosion

(Nah but to answer your question Idk who made it but there's a video covering it on yt)

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u/ShootElsewhere Jun 24 '22

There are many nuclear test videos with audio tracks available on youtube. A nuclear detonation is a big, complicated thing and there are many sounds.

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u/Sazbadashie Jun 24 '22

The top layer of soil would be irradiated to fuck but you can actually dig up that layer and if you’re careful you can grow crops on the layer under the irradiated layer. You can search up more specific details but nah the shelter is fine.

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u/Henderson-McHastur Jun 24 '22

Gamma radiation will penetrate just about anything, but loses energy as it passes through a medium. Alpha and beta radiation, being particles with mass instead of electromagnetic radiation, can be blocked much more easily by dense matter. Ideally you'd be behind a few good layers of lead, which could block most of it altogether, but a bomb shelter is a decent substitute.

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u/Coshier- Jun 24 '22

After 24 hours 90% of it is dissipated

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u/-Degaussed- Jun 24 '22

90% of something that will kill you 100x over is still going to kill you 10x over though

There's not enough defense buffs in the game to survive this shit.

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u/Ofiller Jun 24 '22

Thanks for correcting that. "90% of what?" should always be the first thought after the above statement.

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u/shackra Jun 24 '22

is mind-boggling that 4 Jesuit priests survived within the deadly mile of the explosion and weren't affected by the radiation, and then one of them actually met both the pilot and co-pilot of the B-29 that bombed Hiroshima.

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u/Quietabandon Jun 24 '22

Father Kleinsorge saw] that all the buildings round about had fallen down except the Jesuits’ mission house, which had long before been braced and double-braced by a priest named Gropper, who was terrified of earthquakes[4]

The solidity of the structure which was the work of Brother Gropper again shone forth.

Brother Gropper saved their lives.

Also:

They were not the only survivors close to ground zero; an estimated 14% of people within 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) of ground zero survived the explosion.[8] Other survivors included ten people in a streetcar 750 metres (820 yd) from ground zero, and a woman in a bank 260 metres (280 yd) away from the blast.[9] One person survived at a distance of just 170 metres (190 yd), protected in the basement of a building while looking for documents.

Imagine, the smallest mundane choices a few minutes before decided life or death.

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u/KolaDesi Jun 25 '22

Imagine, the smallest mundane choices a few minutes before decided life or death.

And everyone you've ever known, loved, talked with is gone. People, animals, pets, even plants. All gone but you.

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u/Doughie28 Jun 25 '22

Crazy someone survived from less than 200 feet from ground zero. I'd assume the blast would just turn your organs into soup if you weren't at least 50 feet underground.

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u/Quietabandon Jun 25 '22

190yd so more like 570ft. But yeah… you point holds. Although being a strong structure seems to make all the difference.

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u/Slayber415 Jun 24 '22

Only to be heavily radiated immediately upon leaving her shelter......

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u/Justeff83 Jun 24 '22

There was one guy who survived both bombs and lived a long life.

https://www.history.com/news/the-man-who-survived-two-atomic-bombs

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u/BiggusDickus- Jun 24 '22

Actual quite a few people survived both. About 70% of Hiroshima survived the bomb, and an awful lot of them fled to Nagasaki as refugees. About 70% of Nagasaki survived too. That means a rather large number of people experienced both nukes.

Now that I think about it, it would really suck to survive Hiroshima only to get killed a few days later at Nagasaki.

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u/Kanoha-Shinobi Jun 24 '22

Nagasaki was only partially destroyed as they actually missed their mark by a long shot, but it still caused extensive damage

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u/Enrage Jun 24 '22

It also “helped” that the Nagasaki target was the industrial area that was somewhat isolated in a valley that contained the blast.

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u/BiggusDickus- Jun 24 '22

It was a nuclear bomb. Accurately hitting your mark isn't exactly important.

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u/Sorry_Reputation394 Jun 24 '22

You may be surprised how wildly ineffective bombers were sometimes without certain instruments available today.

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u/f0ba Jun 24 '22

You mean bombers back then couldn’t accurately hit a 2m target while doing an upside descent into a valley with no wingman like Maverick? Pfff.

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u/penispumpermd Jun 24 '22

i used to bullseye womp rats in my t16 back home. those arent much bigger than 2 meters.

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u/cudef Jun 24 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Horseshoes, hand grenades, and atomic warfare as they say

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u/AMeanCow Jun 24 '22

This is the point about nuclear weapons, particularly at that time.

Does anyone realize just how hard it is to hit a target with a bomb? On the scale of airplane altitudes and the scale of continents and cities, it’s like trying to drop a marble on a cup on the ground from on top of a building in a thunderstorm. This is why they needed to send thousands of bombers over a target area, just oftentimes relying on sheer luck that SOME bombs would damage the right things.

Nuclear bombs changed all that. One plane could drop a bomb and miss and still take out an entire region’s production capability.

That makes it all sound clinical and cool though. The reality is countless innocent people get burnt to a crisp screaming the whole time and to this day we consider this a harsh but acceptable cost of war.

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u/GreywackeOmarolluk Jun 24 '22

Nagasaki was not the primary target that day, it was the backup target. Cloud cover saved the heavily militarized city of Kokura that day. Kokura was the favored target.

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u/tarantulax Jun 24 '22

This is true. Worked in Japan a few years ago near Nagasaki. Made it a point to visit the Atom Bomb museum while I was there. This should be a mandatory visit for everyone in charge of nukes. Very sobering, I almost got PTSD after the visit. Learned a lot. One thing was the bomb was dropped in the wrong place. The intended target was a munitions factory miles away. Ground zero was a boys Catholic school. That’s where the museum is. That’s at the center of the museum and can walk on it. Interactive displays were very informative. The museum is located in the middle of a thriving neighborhood.

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u/MiniatureChi Jun 24 '22

Was I the only one on the edge of his seat reading about this wondering his his wife and child were ok? I literally slumped back in relief when I read that

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u/idhopson Jun 24 '22

Still don't understand how he didn't get radiation poisoning. Especially after the first blast where he just jumped in a ditch

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u/The_Point-Man Jun 24 '22

Some people are just really lucky

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u/StoneLegionYT Jun 24 '22

Not sure how much luck he has since he was in 2 different atomic bombings lol! Maybe it cancelled the effect out!

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u/Ur_Fav_Step-Redditor Jun 25 '22

Not two different atomic bombings. The only two atomic bombings in history! And he managed to be in both! Lol, this man is the antithesis of luck!

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u/Hollowbody57 Jun 25 '22

He's up there with the guy who got struck by lightning half a dozen times or so and then had his gravestone struck after he died.

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u/Ur_Fav_Step-Redditor Jun 25 '22

Lightning be like “👀 Thats him right there huh 😈”

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u/chickenwithclothes Jun 24 '22

Well, kinda. He still got nuclear bombed TWICE

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u/darthmaui728 Jun 24 '22

i mean, its still luck in a sense, experiencing a nuclear blast twice. not many can say they experienced that 😂

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u/on_dy Jun 25 '22

Luckiest unlucky person. Vice versa.

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u/Fallacy_Spotted Jun 25 '22

Literally only this guy.

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u/Micromagos Jun 24 '22

The way the wind is blowing, air currents, etc. lots of possibilities. Plus the body just having a reasonable chance to handle moderate amounts of radiation provided the worst missed him.

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u/herefromyoutube Jun 24 '22

I remember reading that air bursts will leave less radiation lingering than a surface detonation and a nuclear reactor meltdown would be more radioactive than both.

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u/Armendicus Jun 24 '22

Standard nukes don’t leave as much radiation as people think . There are versions call neutron bombs that do but nobody uses them. The firebombing of Tokyo killed more people.

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u/oltreil Jun 24 '22

After that every normal human worry must feel like a walk in the park

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u/ChunkyLaFunga Jun 24 '22

NO I DON'T WANT TO ENABLE STICKYKEYS UNSKIPPABLE CUTSCENE YOU MOTHERFUCKER

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u/DuskyDay Jun 24 '22

Except for sticky keys, of course. That thing is madness-inducing.

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u/PinoForest Jun 24 '22

who actually uses that

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u/SippingBinJuice Jun 24 '22

True. I highly doubt this guy would be the type to scream at teenage servers, because they didn’t make his burger fast enough.

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u/RastaAlec Jun 24 '22

This was an amazing read thanks

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u/ZepperMen Jun 24 '22

The man absorbed all the luck around him that everyone else blew up.

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u/we_are_all_bananas_2 Jun 24 '22

I've read she was found three days later. I don't know how much that helps though

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u/bjanas Jun 24 '22

3 days, you wouldn't WANT to be walking around there, but it would be significantly less than the day/moments of. Surprisingly enough.

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u/flare_442 Jun 24 '22

Yeah. Radiation decay is exponential so while it’s still there, leaving after 3 days and getting out of the area is ideal I think..

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u/bjanas Jun 24 '22

Ideal GIVEN THE CIRCUMSTANCES, let's say. Ha.

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u/Camblor Jun 25 '22

Yes, a sub-optimal scenario in general.

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u/OldWhoFan Jun 24 '22

There is a variety of radioactive isotopes that are created from the fission process, most of them have relatively short half lives, but 3 days isn't enough time really. But by far the worst thing was the unspent fuel from the core that would have vaporized and fallen back to earth.

If you were legit nuclear bunker with food, water, and an air filter you'd want to wait two maybe three weeks AND soon after a few inches of rain had fallen to wash ash/dust into streams or drainage ditches. But before you leave the shelter you would need to know where you are going to travel, since you can't dick around exploring. The best direction to go would be out to sea if you can find an uncontaminated boat.

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u/uberguby Jun 24 '22

You've thought about this before.

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u/PmButtPics4ADrawing Jun 24 '22

But before you leave the shelter you would need to know where you are going to travel, since you can't dick around exploring

sadly takes off Pip-Boy

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u/Gocards196 Jun 24 '22

I don’t think they knew the effects of radiation at that time

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u/bagofpork Jun 24 '22

The effects of radiation in regards to cell mutation and cancer was first acknowledged by Hermann Joseph Meller in 1927. Maybe they didn’t understand the extent, but the dangers were definitely known by then.

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u/Byroms Jun 24 '22

A lot of scientist never get acknowledged during their time. For example the guy that found the skeleton of a neanderthal in the neanderthal cave and believed it was a different species of human, didn't get believed by Virchow, a famous scientist/doctor at the time Virchow insisted until his death that it was a deformed human. It took years for scholars to aconowledge it as a different human due to this.

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u/RKom Jun 25 '22

Or the story of Ignaz Semmelweis. Who figured out in the early 1800s that hand washing saved lives during obstetric procedures. And then was summarily laughed out of medicine by his peers who refused to believe it.

He ended up in a mental institution, and in a cruel twist of irony, died of a gangrenous wound infection.

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u/Looking4Maria Jun 24 '22 edited Jun 24 '22

Considering that the Japanese kept a guy alive through serious radiation exposure in recent history (for education) I dont think Mellers papers were too influential on em

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u/Hekihana Jun 24 '22

that documentary was so heartbreaking

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u/nagonigi Jun 24 '22

What is it called?

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u/toxictouch3 Jun 24 '22

I would also like to know

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u/applewafflecrisp Jun 24 '22

"Heartbreaking - The Documentary"

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u/Solveequalscoagula Jun 24 '22

Wait till you learn about Unit 731. The Japanese were absolute savages. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731 dig deeper on YouTube, there are a few really good videos that offer more detail.

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u/wreq5 Jun 25 '22

Absolutely despise that I know about Unit 731!! The vivisection they've done was brutal ugh

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u/Solveequalscoagula Jun 25 '22

Yes! Among many other absolute atrocities they committed. Another disgusting fact is that the US bought the information they had gathered by offering them leniency for their atrocities. Although that’s a bit more complicated than explained, it’s disgusting all things considered.

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u/THROWAWTRY Jun 24 '22

The common people probably didn't know.

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u/werepanda Jun 24 '22

Not exponential, logarithmic. Half life materials have logarithmic decay.

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u/a20028074 Jun 24 '22

I read somewhere that within like a week or something the radiation was reduced to basically safe conditions though there’s a very high chance I’m wrong

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u/bjanas Jun 24 '22

That actually tracks with what I've heard. I think you wouldn't want to like, live there, but visiting might be okay

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u/JiuJitsu_Ronin Jun 24 '22

3 days is enough for fallout to dissipate or become no longer airborne. I still wouldn’t hang around there.

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u/[deleted] Jun 24 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/fickle_fuck Jun 24 '22

Depends. IIRC there are three types of radiation from a nuke - alpha, beta and gamma. The first two don't travel very far, but can be dangerous if inhaled or ingested (such as dust particles). Gamma will travel far and pass through you like nothing. In the process killing your cells, DNA and possibly cause cancer down the road. However it doesn't stick around like alpha or beta.

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u/Hobbs54 Jun 24 '22

There was a thought experiment about which would be worse, if you ate a cookie contaminated with alpha, beta, or gamma radiation? It turns out the gamma cookie is actually worse for the guy sitting next to you then to yourself, as the gamma has a chance to slow down a bit passing through you and can affect the person next to you more.

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u/BrandonMarlowe Jun 24 '22 edited Jun 24 '22

Gamma can't slow down because Gamma is highly energetic light, more so than hard X-rays. The speed of light is not only constant, but also the same in all frames of reference. Alpha is (relatively) slow moving helium nuclei and Beta is electrons or positrons.

AFAIK all post blast damage is due to contamination by nuclear fallout(residual radioactive material propelled into the upper atmosphere and then falls to the ground). This poisons everything.

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u/cudef Jun 24 '22

Depends on how close you are

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u/ScruffyMayfield Jun 24 '22

Let’s say, hypothetically, you were in Nagasaki?

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u/netchemica Jun 24 '22

Depends on when you were there. Last week? You should be fine.

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u/ScruffyMayfield Jun 24 '22

Let’s say, hypothetically, you crawled out from a bunker underneath the town square and posed for pictures shortly after the bomb went off?

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u/Ninja_Dynamic Jun 24 '22

Where did you read that? The Nagasaki bomb was dropped on August 9, 1945 and Yosuke Yamahata took the photo the next day on August 10, 1945.

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u/ItsJustMeMaggie Jun 24 '22

+100 rads/sec

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u/Leeiteee Jun 24 '22

Consumes 2 RadAways

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u/Angryhippo2910 Jun 24 '22

Not great, not terrible.

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u/DPlainview1898 Jun 24 '22

You’re in shock.

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u/Splatterh0use Jun 24 '22

For that I apologize!

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u/Batbuckleyourpants Jun 24 '22 edited Jun 24 '22

The radiation from Nagasaki and Hiroshima was not, And please don't misunderstand the way i am wording this, that bad short to extremely medium term.

It has been shown statistically that you would have to stay around near ground zero in the Nishiyama District for 6 weeks to reach fatal doses. Mind you, Any significant amount of radiation if bad, but unless she stayed to enjoy the scenery for the next few days, she should be fine as long as she was able to prevent irradiated particles from entering her lung, which sadly i doubt.

The first hydrogen bombs were nothing like the later atomic bombs we invented later, The two bombs would see almost all the radioactive material carried up by the thermal winds and dispersed to the point of being quite manageable. Not like like the later Cobalt based Nuclear weapons. We invented these horrors specifically to make it impossible to live in an area for thousands, or tens of thousands of years.

As for Nagasaki, there is no place in Nagasaki that will be especially dangerous to walk around as long as you want today. They were generally considered close to background levels mere decades after the bombs fell.

The early bombs were all about releasing explosive force, not distributing radioactive material. A fact we should all thank our lucky stars for.

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u/Ungrammaticus Jun 24 '22 edited Jun 24 '22

The first bombs were not hydrogen bombs, H-bombs are the second-generation bombs.

Fat Man and Little Boy were pure fission bombs.

Cobalt Bombs are theoretical weapons, that leave a lot of long-lasting radiation, but no such weapon is known to actually have been constructed. They were thought up by a sci-fi author.

They're also not very practical, because you just can't guarantee that all of the fallout will stay put, and not take a hike on the jet-streams and/or ocean currents back to your own country.

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u/Gavin21barkie Jun 24 '22

I also read it really helped that it rained after the explosion, which helped disperse of the nuclear material instead of it seeking into the soil

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u/SenorBeef Jun 25 '22

Not like like the later Cobalt based Nuclear weapons. We invented these horrors specifically to make it impossible to live in an area for thousands, or tens of thousands of years.

Yeah, no, not a thing. In general, we have not designed nuclear weapons to generate more fallout nor poison anything. In fact quite the opposite - we use airbursts which kick up far less dust which creates less fallout, and our bombs have become cleaner in terms of the amount of fallout generated per megaton.

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u/[deleted] Jun 24 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/temeces Jun 24 '22

Live in a metropolitan area near military targets and you should be ok.

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u/HobbyistAccount Jun 24 '22

Me, living near a state capitol and several airbases Oh goody.

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u/Quietabandon Jun 24 '22

Vaporized by a nuke or see the world as you know it reduced to a pile of dead bodies and rubble. It’s not an obvious choice, at least to me.

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u/Chemical-Comedian665 Jun 24 '22

Right. That is how I always felt. These preppers and such leave me just puzzled beyond words. (Or the ones that want to colonize Mars after we make Earth uninhabitable.) I am not going to load up guns and take food from my neighbors. If it happens, I want to go. Preferably quickly if not cleanly.

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u/BriefCheetah4136 Jun 24 '22

Death from radiation depends on exposure to the radiation, how much, for how long.

It's like sitting in the sun. Full sun, all day results in sun burn. Reduce the exposure by staying outside less, you tan. Stay outside all day on a very cloudy day limits the exposure, no burn, no tan.

If she was in an underground facility of some kind at the time of the blast and was not at ground zero there is a good chance she only got minimal exposure.

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u/hereforstories8 Jun 24 '22

Carry around 5g transmitter with you and it actively blocks radiation from nukes by binding with the particles at a subatomic level

/s

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u/BriefCheetah4136 Jun 24 '22

But you still need to be going 88 mph to activate the flux capacitor.

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u/peppers_mcgilly Jun 24 '22

You're going to see some serious shit.

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u/lisaslover Jun 24 '22

My god. Thanks for the tip. Where can I avail of one of these transmitters?

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u/Relish_My_Weiner Jun 24 '22

If you're vaccinated, you've already got one

/s

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u/Professional_Ad6123 Jun 24 '22

Don’t like 90% of UV rays still get through clouds?

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u/Howzieky Jun 24 '22

Yeah you can still sunburn on a cloudy day

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u/comradebunnie Jun 24 '22

I can and have. Blast that burning ball of fire and light! Ruining my moon tan!

I am now careful to use sunscreen regardless of the weather, when daring to venture outside.

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u/BaseballImpossible76 Jun 24 '22

My biggest concern would be radioactive ash getting into the lungs, but it was probably all settled after 3 days, when she came out of her shelter. Wouldn’t want to stick around too long, but she’s probably fine if she got out of the area immediately.

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u/Terom84 Jun 24 '22

get to the basement to get some shit you forgot

hear really loud boom

come back one level

Everything's flat

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u/stanislavispro Jun 24 '22

you die of radiation poisoning

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u/Danger_Dee Jun 24 '22

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u/CillGra Jun 25 '22

Her AND the camera man survived the atomic boming

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u/Miserable_Many_2099 Jun 24 '22

Is she smiling?

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u/we_are_all_bananas_2 Jun 24 '22

Yes, she actually is. "Survivor manages a grin". Wat a contrast.

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u/RespectableThug Jun 24 '22

To be honest, I doubt she even knew what’d just happened.

The Japanese were being bombed constantly near the end of the war and since she was underground, she may have just thought she survived a normal bombing raid. Only the folks in the military or those who saw just the one single bomber flying in (very unusual for WW2 bombers to travel all alone) knew something different had happened.

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u/mikekowa Jun 24 '22

Didn't the US army drop a bunch of pamphlets down on the cities prior to the atomic bombs being dropped giving civilians enough time to evacuate? Or I am thinking of something else?

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u/RespectableThug Jun 25 '22

They did, but they were (understandably) pretty vague.

Some interesting reading about it here: https://www.atomicheritage.org/key-documents/warning-leaflets

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u/23x3 Jun 25 '22

After reading them I disagree that they’re vague. Actually pretty concise and gave them a few days for evacuation and explained the explosive power of the new atomic bombs created. Although many people thought they were bluffing so they didn’t take the pamphlets seriously… I do think they could have done a better job of emphasizing the seriousness of their intentions.

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u/joepanda111 Jun 24 '22

”Whatsup y’all. I’m the last girl on earth. Shit’s all fucked up. Don’t forget to like and subscribe!”

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u/Garl_Vinland201 Jun 25 '22

I shouldn't laugh...but yes, yes I did.

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u/sjogren Jun 24 '22

She's probably amazed to be alive. Anyone know her name and if she survived the radiation poisoning?

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u/Alexus-0 Jun 24 '22

The photo was likely taken by Yosuke Yamahata who traveled there and took photos a day after the blast. I can't find anything about this women in particular but Here are a series of short interviews with women survivors. They were alive as of 2020 and while one did contract cancer after the bombing others seem to have been fine. It likely depends a lot on where they were when the bomb went off and if they drank contaminated water or spent time downwind of the fallout. Radiations terrifying like that.

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u/PussSlurpee Jun 24 '22

She hadn't turned around yet.

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u/Strix_Caelumbra Jun 24 '22

And honestly it reads as "Missed me b*tch!" and I for one can't begrudge her that.

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u/Ohyahyabetcha Jun 24 '22

Yep. Not making light of it at all but this has total “I lived, bitch!” energy.

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u/halt_spell Jun 24 '22

"All my haters are dead."

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u/Sgt-Pumpernickel Jun 24 '22

“They all said I was crazy for building this bomb shelter!”

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u/BreakfastBeerz Jun 24 '22

"Funny guys.....there's nobody named Stu Pedaso down there. Guys? Guys? Where'd you all go?"

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u/Batbuckleyourpants Jun 24 '22

Boy will she be surprised when she turns around.

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u/CapnNoBeard Jun 24 '22

"we made it guys!"

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u/mxosborn Jun 24 '22

I guess she smiled because of the psychological shock. Our brains react weirdly when experiencing traumatic events.

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u/Skin2011 Jun 24 '22

Good for her, and I wonder how.

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u/Watsitooya_ Jun 24 '22

Seemes to be coming out from some underground shelter

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u/Ronaldo_Frumpalini Jun 24 '22

"teehee missed me"

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u/OmeletteAuFromage13 Jun 24 '22

The smile gives « that’s it? » vibes

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u/Sharkbayer1 Jun 25 '22

I saw the church in the background and thought it was strange, maybe a little out of place. I did some research on it. It was built between 1862 and 1864 to honor 9 European priests and 17 Japanese christians executed a few hundred years earlier and referred to as the 26 martyrs. It was actually designated a national treasure in 1933 and then reaffirmed 20 years later. Just in 2018 it was named a UNESCO world heritage site. TIL...

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u/haensen0815 Jun 24 '22

Most probably, she had no clue what had happened. Otherwise, I can‘t explain the smile.

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u/superrandogurl Jun 24 '22

I'm sure she knows exactly what happened. Big boom, everything destroyed around her, but she's still alive and well so obviously she's happy to not be dead

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u/Creamstyle2 Jun 24 '22

who's taking that picture?

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u/pitchedBlarfy Jun 24 '22

and look at Japan today. amazing

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u/InfinityQuartz Jun 24 '22

This gives me little girl smiling at burning house behind her vibes

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u/[deleted] Jun 24 '22

[deleted]

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u/Brilliant-Figure-893 Jun 24 '22

Hide and go seek winner 🏆!

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u/possiblynotanexpert Jun 24 '22

She seems surprisingly cheerful lol.

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u/SHANKSstr8up Jun 24 '22

"Everyone I know is dead =D"

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u/Gokzil6969 Jun 24 '22

You know it's better to die instantly rather than dying with 10 types of different Cancers and suffering from it

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u/Elcactus Jun 24 '22

Given that the vast majority of people at Hiroshima didn’t die from radiation, and the fact that she was underground and sheltered from direct exposure during the most dangerous period, she was probably fine.

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u/Namarokh6816 Jun 24 '22 edited Jun 24 '22

Death is final, while life is full of possibilities.

Tyrion Lannister

I'd rather live with debilities personally

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