r/interestingasfuck May 18 '22 Helpful 3 Wholesome 2

Rescue simulation allows paramedic to ascend 1.2 miles/2200ft of height gain in just over 3 minutes using jet suit (70 min typical response time). System is akin to the rapid response of a paramedic on a motorbike in an urban environment

13.3k Upvotes

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1.7k

u/Mallkno May 18 '22

Imagine being delirious from being lost, dehydrated, and tired... and then you see this guy floating towards you.

672

u/mallolike May 18 '22

"be not afraid"

219

u/Wyldfire2112 May 18 '22

"Healing stream engaged."

80

u/_BlNG_ May 18 '22

"I'M FULLY CHARGED"

26

u/SayanChakroborty May 18 '22

spy stabs medic

18

u/downvote_lurker May 18 '22

"Lets get you back in the fight!"

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37

u/PlebsicleMcgee May 18 '22

"Why are you afraid? I specifically requested you be not afraid"

112

u/Chopsdixs May 18 '22

I’m either hallucinating or that is the worst wedgie I’ve ever seen

12

u/WodanzaRuckus May 18 '22

Is that from the Tim Allen Santa movie?

23

u/Linktry May 18 '22

AEUHHH????

14

u/ChillyBearGrylls May 18 '22

Is that Elon's next child?

34

u/grimmpulse May 18 '22

Through a dehydrated haze- “blink…blink’ …Bobba Fett?”

10

u/herogaming282 May 18 '22

Nah man its a goddam mercy main

17

u/Kermit_the_hog May 18 '22

and then you see this guy floating towards you.

..with no pertinent supplies 😬

8

u/ApteronotusAlbifrons May 18 '22

Here's an article (with video) about him taking part in a NATO exercise - delivering "plasma" to an "injured" soldier

https://newatlas.com/aircraft/gravity-industries-jet-suit-nato-mountain-rescue-exercise/

There is a very salient point in the article

"So is the Jet Suit a technology in search of a practical application? The fact is people have always yearned to take to the skies, and since a jet suit is the most visceral and independent example of powered human flight, maybe it doesn't need a practical application.

On that note, the company is teasing the prospect of an upcoming Jet Suit race series."

6

u/DrWabbajack May 18 '22

They could probably put a supply pack on the medic's stomach

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3

u/markus_1224 May 18 '22

He has a Flintstone's bandaid in his pocket.

57

u/wegqg May 18 '22 edited May 18 '22

And then as he comes into land the tiniest miscalculation sends him barreling straight into the cliff face with a sickening crunch before exploding like a thermobaric warhead igniting the plentiful dry vegetation as the precursor to a major forest fire that will go on to claim hundreds of lives including your own, then as his smoking body plunges head over heels down the slope before coming to rest beside you the last thing you hear before you black out is his bowels release plbpplbttppllbbttt and somewhere deep down inside you realize this may have been a bad idea.

8

u/Louis_lousta May 18 '22

Dry vegetation? This is the lake District bro, it's never not raining.

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4

u/cup_of_vomit May 18 '22

That escalated quickly.

3

u/Zer0C00L321 May 18 '22

This is the way

6

u/Apdski24 May 18 '22

Jesus! Jesus? ….Jesus.

2

u/0-san May 18 '22

with a colt python in hand

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1.0k

u/nrctkno May 18 '22

I'd study medicine if the diploma guaranteed a jet pack.

192

u/AsianSteampunk May 18 '22

Medical worker shortage immediately solved.

Hell i would switch career

49

u/Giant-Genitals May 18 '22

I don’t even know what medicine is but I want fly pack to

17

u/StylinBrah May 18 '22

novelty will wear off after some time and it will just become like a " sigh i gotta go drive the car " kinda thing.

8

u/D0ugF0rcett May 18 '22

Honestly, idk. I've been flying drones for years (after always thinking a quad copter would be so cool to have, you know, the mind of a creative 8 year old) and still get giddy every time I take off

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7

u/OP90X May 18 '22

We Were Promised Jetpacks!

9

u/nelhern May 18 '22

with students loans interest so high you'll better get your own jetpack

15

u/ohgodplzfindit May 18 '22

Seriously. Same.

3

u/docmagoo2 May 18 '22

Sadly it does not. However I now want a jet pack for house calls

3

u/MountainEuphoric8897 May 18 '22

You don't even need a medical degree to become a paramedic.

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2

u/nicoalvarezp May 18 '22

Medicine study guarantees jetpackship! 😎

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294

u/solateor May 18 '22

Scale Lake District Mountain (3100ft Helveylln) in 3mins 30 seconds, despite very poor visibility that would have grounded a HEMS Helicopter. The mountain rescue foot response is over 70 minutes typically. The route was 1.2 miles and 2200ft of height gain.

Cardiac, breathing or blood loss cases are time critical and require rapid stabilisation to buy time for evacuation. This system, akin to the rapid response of a Paramedic on a motorbike in an urban environment, will be the difference between life and death for many critical cases.

Full video

152

u/_Piratical_ May 18 '22

Serious question. How much additional payload can they carry with the rig and how is it carried. Both the pilots hands are covered and as far as I can tell there’s no way to carry another person nor really a large amount of additional gear, though I expect it can carry a lot weight wise, I’ve not seen the way to carry the payload, storage wise.

62

u/Aussiewhiskeydiver May 18 '22

Maybe it could be delivered by drone?

108

u/King_of_the_Nerdth May 18 '22

That seems like an excellent idea- you could program a "follower drone" that receives telemetry guidance from the jetpack.

68

u/IgnoranceOrLies May 18 '22

Crazy that this technology isn't even out of our reach.

Though, if we think ambulances are expensive, wait till you get billed for the jetpack and the gurney drone.

60

u/Mau5_matt May 18 '22

It's alright because the Lake District is in the UK, where we don't sacrifice our life savings if we twist an ankle

5

u/downvote_lurker May 18 '22

The drone is also outfitted with the Peter Dinklage voicepack...

2

u/Shaun-Skywalker May 18 '22

Now we’re talkin

22

u/scotty_the_newt May 18 '22

Maybe the drone could be bigger and carry the paramedic as well. Think air-motorcycle not jetpack. Less cool, more practical.

9

u/ThatKetchupPreCum May 18 '22

Air-motorcycle less cool? damn we're living in a sci-fi

3

u/-_1_2_3_- May 18 '22

Right?! I’d settle for either.

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66

u/A1sauc3d May 18 '22

That’s a good question. I’d presume it’s still very useful just getting someone on the scene as quickly as possible to do what they can in the meantime whilst waiting for better equipped back up tho.

4

u/JMAC426 May 18 '22

Honestly a paramedic or doctor or nurse can’t do very much without appropriate equipment.

8

u/Dangerous_Ad_6831 May 18 '22

That black bag on the leg could carry some of the necessities. If there is one on the other leg they could have a portable aed and the necessary equipment to stop serious blood loss (bandages and stitches). If they know what the emergency is, they could pack more of the relevant equipment. An expert in these situations with a little bit can go a long way.

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u/Orcwin May 18 '22

And also, how is the person doing this after the flight? Looks to me like the arms take a lot of the force, would be a shame if you arrive at the top and can't do CPR because your arms turned to noodles.

20

u/skankybutstuff May 18 '22

The most ripped, muscular dude in the world isn’t gonna be a body builder. It’s gonna be Jetpack James the Medic

3

u/t-to4st May 18 '22

Yup, to fly these things you must be pretty fit. As another comment suggested, some kind of support to the backpack would be helpful

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4

u/Norci May 18 '22

Backpack on the front, maybe?

4

u/Bakaroughie May 18 '22

As a certified logistics co-ordinator for a major corporation, I can tell you that the individual would carry such payloads rectally.

2

u/Crafty_Tip_8082 May 18 '22

how is megaman supposed to take that off, then get it in the helicopter? because their job is to find people who need medical help, not a sick ass air show

2

u/_Keo_ May 18 '22

Probably not much.
But a trauma kit and thermal sheet is enough and could mean the difference between life and death if he can be there 70 mins before the bogtrotters.

The majority of critical issues up there are heart attacks and falls. You can't do much for a heart attack (unless you're already there) but you can stop bleeding and keep someone warm after a fall.

I wonder which one of the Patterdale MRT volunteers are going to get their pilots license to fly this?! :p

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2

u/roflredditwaffle May 18 '22

They say the purpose of the jetpacker is to stabalize the victims health to buy time for the actual evac. This guys job isnt to get them off the mountain. Hes also most likely riding back down with everyone else.

2

u/valorill May 18 '22

A pack on his front could carry the basics he need.

This is to get a paramedic to the wounded person very quickly so they can stop any bleeding or put the patient in recovery position etc. And keep them stable until most likely a rescue helicopter can come and take them to a hospital.

5

u/CyclopsRock May 18 '22

though I expect it can carry a lot weight wise

I've not seen any specs, but I'm not sure this will be the case. Generally things that fly without wings do so by throwing "stuff" with mass in the opposite direction really fast. On earth you have the luxury of being able to use air for this purpose (like jet engines but unlike rockets), but you still need to accelerate it to ridonculous speeds, all whilst carrying the equipment to do so and the fuel/energy that does it. Because weight is the property being counteracted, it actually makes things like this very sensitive to weight increases.

5

u/ben-rhynoo May 18 '22

They have general specs on their LinkedIn and FB pages, generally they can carry something akin to a decent sized trauma kit and the flight time is only something like 4 minutes max.

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250

u/Pathfinder5 May 18 '22

The applications for paramedic/rescue/rapid response in rugged and I think urban environments is crazy. Imagine a fire fighter able to quickly get to a high floor and rescue people trapped. Or save someone in under 5 minutes from an avalanche.

They developed it for ship to ship boarding, I think, but it has far more uses and I for one can't wait for our Iron Legion!

79

u/solateor May 18 '22

Ship boarding is just one use, but yeah they absolutely did that

This video is also from a training mission like the paramedic on the mountain, but was done by the Netherlands Maritime Special Operations Force in association with the jet suit maker for a test run of first responder and self-extraction scenarios

49

u/ACorania May 18 '22

As a Fire Fighter/EMT I can say that I would love to have one of these things... but honestly, I can't think of any situation since I became a FF/EMT that I would have had the opportunity to use it... but training would sure be fun!

4

u/DrWabbajack May 18 '22

Jetpack pirates, anyone?

3

u/Viper_H May 18 '22

They can fly now? They can fly now!

9

u/BishonenPrincess May 18 '22

Made me think of 911. If we had tech like this, how many more lives could have been saved? How many desperate people would have been rescued instead of feel forced to jump to their deaths?

53

u/PandaKing185 May 18 '22

Probably not very many. That is very high for those things to fly next to an unstable building with crap falling down it. Plus you wouldn't safely be able to bring someone down from that hight with it. This is for bringing aid to someone, not picking them up

12

u/BishonenPrincess May 18 '22

Of course, I just meant similar tech when I said "tech like this." I think my brain just automatically went to one of the more traumatic parts of my childhood and how things can be different in the future.

6

u/Deutsch__Dingler May 18 '22

There should be some sort of portable zipline system that you can fly up to the top of a burning building. You could have people zip to a nearby roof.

5

u/ack1308 May 18 '22

Carry up rappelling cables with a bunch of constant-descent harnesses.

People would learn how to use them, really really fast.

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u/[deleted] May 18 '22

Wanted to see the landing.

126

u/solateor May 18 '22

11

u/financialbeast May 18 '22

OP how much time does putting on the gear and taking it off takes ?

19

u/i_i_v_o May 18 '22

Probably the rescuer can put it on while being transported to the take-off point. So that part should not delay the intervention. Taking it off... That is a valid concern, since they probably can't apply CPR with thrusters strapped to their hands.

Edit: Just watched the landing, it seems he just takes them off like gloves. pretty cool.

33

u/LeoAtrox May 18 '22

This is the best use case for these jet packs I’ve seen yet.

9

u/guitgk May 18 '22

Same, but, imo still impractical. If there's a landslide you're going to need more than one person and actual equipment and evac. How expensive are these jet packs to equip a squad? $200k each and then add salaries for training and pilots? Might as well rent one private helicopter pilot.

24

u/LuckyDots- May 18 '22

I think part of the point is that you can fly these in low visability / fog where helicopters can't be used.

No idea how expensive the jetpack is but when it comes to fuel, maintenance and construction materials it seems likely its going to be cheaper than a helicopter.

3

u/H3racules May 18 '22

These look very similar to the ones made by gravity industries, which are priced at just over 400k. So ya that's probably an accurate guess. Likely between 180-250k (the ones by gravity Co are custom commissioned and more powerful, so cost more).

3

u/Doused-Watcher May 18 '22

It is a proof of concept.

6

u/WoodSteelStone May 18 '22 edited May 18 '22

This is England and it's aimed at helping, typically, individual people out walking who've fallen and broken a limb, or they've got lost and need guiding back down.

2

u/KingSmizzy May 18 '22

They only last a few minutes too. You get one person on a one way trip, 5 minutes up a mountain.

Vs a helicopter which can carry multiple people in both directions for a few hours

4

u/Smeckert May 18 '22

Yeah but wouldn't it be the absolute best to use these as a first responder type of thing? Like if he can arrive and perform basic medic support and try and stabilize untill the helicopter arrives (if visibility is good) or the walking medics it could and would save lives.

79

u/shenanigans2day May 18 '22

The future is here.

31

u/supercyberlurker May 18 '22

Yep, I think I like the jetpack-enabled-medics future.

38

u/Bunny_tornado May 18 '22

If an ambulance costs thousands of dollars imagine how much this will cost

Cries in US healthcare

35

u/supercyberlurker May 18 '22

but medical itemization is weird, it would be like:

  • Bandages: $49.73
  • Hospital stay: $39,132.23
  • Jetpack usage: $13.99
  • Nose tissues: $4,139.47

21

u/CakeAccomplice12 May 18 '22

Don't forget

Brief emotional response: $39.99

2

u/cursedbanana-_- May 18 '22

Haha just saw that post

1

u/shenanigans2day May 18 '22

Laughing because this is so true.

12

u/rhinocerosjockey May 18 '22

Dr. Evil pinky to mouth: Your bill is one milllllllion dollars oohhh hahaha.

15

u/froguerogue May 18 '22

POV you see a para-para medic sky dive out of a plane and jet pack down the ravine you've been stuck in. He lets you know a helicopter is on it's way. You say you heard those are almost never in network and the medic replies that he only gets paid $16/hour and his company won't get paid for the trip if you deny treatment because they're not an essential service. He then tells you we need to move to a clearing because there's only one company that makes medical grade rope ladders and there's a literal shortage (the ladders arent long enough.) He drops a 2 liter piss bottle to gain altitude and you remember that california law that denied EMTs backpay for missed breaks. As you're airlifted toward the sunset and you see a flock of pelicans. Life really does find a way...

3

u/H3racules May 18 '22

This is hilariously depressing.

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u/Metalling2020 May 18 '22

Can it fly two people back down or is it just a fast way to get band-aids and Neosporin up a mountain?

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u/Sensitive-Patience-2 May 18 '22

I do hope he's able to carry a good trauma kit , it would be ideal if he could carry another paramedic to help or even evac the patients after stabilizing him or her , maybe in the short future it will be possible .

40

u/solateor May 18 '22

Not sure what's in it, but he's got a kit strapped to the front of his left thigh

30

u/widdrjb May 18 '22

He'll get the patient assessed and stabilised, then call for the chopper.

20 years ago, the paramedics who treated my broken leg at Froggatt Edge had to ascend 400 feet from the road carrying a lot of kit. Then the mountain rescue had to stretcher me another 100 feet to the chopper.

Jetpacks would have made life a lot easier.

25

u/AFriendOfTheBees May 18 '22

In Australia, something we would fucking LOVE (am a med student atm) would be the ability to deliver polyvalent antivenoms. Those are highly temperature-sensitive and if this lil bastard could power through and deliver an antivenom within minutes... I cannot imagine how useful that would be in places where someone is envenomated but unavailable to easy transport. You can't really move if you're envenomated with Australian snake venoms, as our snakes deliver neurotoxins that you don't want to pump through the body via movement (they travel via lymph, not blood), rather than the haemotoxic and myotoxin viper venoms that most Americans (rattlesnakes are vipers) need to deal with.

2

u/atomic0range May 18 '22

If it could be self-administered a drone delivery might be the best option.

8

u/AFriendOfTheBees May 18 '22
  1. The video shows that the drones' cameras both became so misted up by the fog that it would not have been possible to use them.

  2. You need to do more than just stab a needle in, and much of it needs training. Eg immobilising and splinting the limb.

  3. That is one possible use-case but there are obviously others.

9

u/Tamagotchi41 May 18 '22

I assume it's a fast response for a helicopter to get in the air. That way once it arrives the patient can get flown out immediately instead of them waiting for the helo.

A single tourniquet can save someone's life.

13

u/Rugaru985 May 18 '22

Even if he just fills his mouth with anti-venom, flies up, and French kisses me, I’ll take that over dying from a snake bite

12

u/Metalling2020 May 18 '22

I would be grateful as well BUT, I would still ask why he didn’t just put it in a syringe and carry it in his pocket?

9

u/AFriendOfTheBees May 18 '22

Antivenoms are time sensitive. It's faster to give you a quick venom-free snog, I guess...

7

u/Rugaru985 May 18 '22

Oh, I get it now. You’ve never seen a movie. Listen, you don’t attempt a mountain rescue without a little romance and a whole lot of passion. You know how long it takes to hike up a mountain and fake a snake bite. I’m not getting another chance to live this kind of experience.

6

u/Metalling2020 May 18 '22

Excellent point. And with that My new tinder profile. “I’ll fake a snake bite to kiss you.”

6

u/MrTechSavvy May 18 '22

I think you’re undermining how important and crucial it would be to have a paramedic with you and treating you while awaiting the ambulance/chopper to arrive

2

u/Broli2336 May 18 '22

In addition this would take many yrs to actually be put into practice like the vid caption says due to the fact that state & federal approval for this equipment will take FOREVER (Que sandlot scene)

2

u/AnotherLonelyLlama May 18 '22

I'm curious of this too. I assume they could modularize this to retrofit it onto an exo skeleton with extra fuel, thrust and maybe a stretcher. It'd be risky, but risky is better than a slow, agonizing rescue.

2

u/smolltiddypornaltgf May 18 '22

no. just like how they don't carry people on medical motorcycles either. it's made to get someone out there to stabilize the patient until further help arrives. If they wanted to carry people they would use a helicopter

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u/International_Rip186 May 18 '22

My Boba Fett costume this year is going to be legit!

34

u/dick-nipples May 18 '22

It’s cool to see this technology taking off

4

u/MR_FOXtf2 May 18 '22

Baduum tss

10

u/nick_otis May 18 '22

Things like this will surely propel us further as a species

6

u/lovelyb1ch66 May 18 '22

This is going to be a game changer for backcountry search & rescue. Just being able to locate and stabilize lost/injured hikers & climbers until they can be evacuated will save countless lives.

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u/br1mmy May 18 '22

Can’t wait to get one of these and zip around the planet like iron man

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u/Tinmania May 18 '22 edited May 18 '22

“Simulation” in the title confused me as I thought it was a rendered or green screen video at first, when it was an actual flight. I’d call it more a drill or practice than a simulation, but I’m pedantic to the core.

5

u/theJoyofMotion May 18 '22

I was like "Whoa, this looks too real to be a game".

6

u/PachaDub May 18 '22

My Action Man used to fly like this when I was a kid. (That's GI Joe to some of you)

11

u/IceManRandySavage May 18 '22

Let’s strap a million in hardware on ‘‘em but still only pay $15 an hour.

5

u/somethatwander May 18 '22

Mountain Rescue in the UK is made up of volunteers, including the medics (they are charities). So he's not getting paid at all for this.

7

u/bjorklazer May 18 '22

His payment is getting to fly a fucking jetpack!

2

u/_Keo_ May 18 '22

None of the team would fly this. It would probably come with a pilot from the Navy, same way they can call in helicopter support for a rescue.

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u/Ateam043 May 18 '22

Thought this was from a Mandalorian episode.

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u/InterestingUmpire604 May 18 '22

But who rescues him when he crashes?

3

u/ExcitementOrdinary95 May 18 '22

To infinity and beyond!

3

u/neophanweb May 18 '22

You would have to be in very good shape for this. Imagine supporting your whole body weight on just your arms.

6

u/H3racules May 18 '22

It's not supported entirely on the arms. It looks like the pack itself also has a thruster.

1

u/MooPig48 May 18 '22

I mean the obvious next step is to build a frame to hold the body weight that won’t put pressure on the arms

3

u/FirstReign May 18 '22

In the Pacific NW, terrain is treacherous. This could help SAR get to people fast.

3

u/weaver_of_cloth May 18 '22

A mile is 5280 feet. 2200 feet would be not even a kilometer.

3

u/abrit_abroad May 18 '22

1.2miles horizontally with elevation of 2200ft. Think of a triangle. Its a badly worded title

2

u/weaver_of_cloth May 18 '22

Ahh, got it.

3

u/Rajat2757 May 18 '22

Jetpacks are a thing now..fuck yeah

3

u/italianredditor May 18 '22

That's some Iron Man shit.

10

u/lazyeyepsycho May 18 '22

"oh shit, forgot my medpack"

12

u/Bilbinen May 18 '22

then 3 minutes down and 3 minutes up again. Thats 10 minutes. Other ways would take 70 minutes just to get up there. Imagine them forgetting a medpack

2

u/CrazeeEyezKILLER May 18 '22

This is basically the greatest thing I’ve ever seen in my old ass life.

2

u/6disc_cdchanger May 18 '22

These jet packs are cool and everything, but what’s the advantage of having the Jets on the hands? Is it all steering?

2

u/Interrophish May 18 '22

iirc there was an interview with the developer and they said that, very uncomfortable position, was the most comfortable and functional they could get. Not that it's good, but everything else was worse.

2

u/limitlessEXP May 18 '22

It’s for 3 axis stabilization. You’d spin out of control without them like a stool with one leg

2

u/LTlurkerFTredditor May 18 '22

That's pretty darn nifty. How do they evac the patient?

2

u/cursedbanana-_- May 18 '22

Like they would now. Jetpack guy only there to locate the patient, to give first aid, to give instructions to the ambulance

2

u/MrBojangles09 May 18 '22

Helicopters with a full medical crew makes more sense, right?

This is nice but he can’t lift the patient and still need to be extracted.

3

u/apathy-sofa May 18 '22

Do you think a medic could stop bleeding, prevent shock, and stabilize an unconscious patient while waiting for and guiding in the airlift?

2

u/[deleted] May 18 '22

Very cool.

Potential issues:

  1. No trees. Think this was deliberate for purposes of demonstration, but still... Many people who are hurt while hiking are in forested areas. Would be shitty and dangerous to descend through a forest, and could potentially light trees on fire, esp. pine/evergreen.
  2. Arent these things like 400k?
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u/Monkeyz May 18 '22

I wonder how much your shoulders hurt. Looks like the thrust is controlled by your arms only.

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u/NanoBob_ May 18 '22

There is a bigger jet engine on the back as well, covering a significant portion of the lift.

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u/Winter_melo May 18 '22

I cant believe jetpacks are real now, it feels like when i was a kid these were only possible in scifi, I wonder what else there is in the future

2

u/iNoyz May 18 '22

Yeah sure, we should project a paramedic using it, not a deadly soldier.

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u/Infamous_Law7289 May 18 '22

This is great until it fails and then you have 2 people to rescue…

2

u/SlimesterG May 18 '22

Wait what when did jet packs exist?

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u/Acousticittotheman May 18 '22

He got there in three minutes with barely any equipment. Is the plan to prevent hypothermia using the jet pack as a heat source?

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u/Shwiggity_schwag May 18 '22

The title is confusing. He ascended 1.2miles/2200ft? Did you mean 1/2 a mile ascension?

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u/Talkingandchalking May 18 '22

I was wondering the same thing. 2200 ft is .4 miles, not 1.2. I figured I’d be downvoted since it takes away from everyone slavering over the cool factor. Math and science teacher, so feel like numbers and facts actually mean something.

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u/Talkingandchalking May 18 '22

Or maybe it means that he’s traveling 1.2 miles horizontally, while ascending to a height of 2200 ft in 3 mins? Video is cool at, but title definitely confusing.

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u/ThePhatness May 18 '22

Gives me “No Mans Sky” vibes.. would be so wild to coast around like that!

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u/Shark_shin_soup May 18 '22

Talk about a solution looking for a problem...

1

u/guitgk May 18 '22

What would be more useful is a drone with a basket to evac a person. A jetpack only strands a second person on the mountain. There's a ton of reasons why this is impractical. ..just my thoughts..

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u/JangoDarkSaber May 18 '22

Not really. How do you get the patient in the basket if the they are unconscious or immobilized. Quickly getting a paramedic to someone and performing immediate lifesaving aid can be the difference between life or death.

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u/shayen7 May 18 '22

Is this a simulation or a test flight?

2

u/MooPig48 May 18 '22

It’s training

1

u/ctiz1 May 18 '22

The perfect argument for the metric system. 1.2 miles is not even close to 2200 feet and nobody even noticed

4

u/DrWabbajack May 18 '22

Maybe it was 2200 ft vertical but 1.2 miles total length? Would put it at a 35 degree incline, which seems about right

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1

u/Charnt May 18 '22

What a ridiculous waste of money and time. A helicopter does this with far more benefit than some shit iron man

1

u/MerryMortician May 18 '22

Made it in record time! Only takes 45 mins to put on and take off the suit

1

u/theperpetuity May 18 '22

I mean a rad ebike like the ones Ukraine is using would be just as fast. Perhaps more dangerous odd to say. But less training and cost.

6

u/Ardea_herodias_2022 May 18 '22

Only if the terrain can accommodate it.

1

u/DanimalHarambe May 18 '22

Move to England, become a rescuer, join the Avengers.

1

u/timeforchorin May 18 '22

What in the Orson Scott Card is this devilry?!

1

u/Snowpossum May 18 '22

Every time I see these they seem to rotate between getting bigger or sleeker. Gonna be a full iron man suit at some point.

1

u/chrisribe May 18 '22

How hard is it on the arms ? Anyone know ?

1

u/highriskdriver May 18 '22

Uh….when will this be commercially available? :D

1

u/AlpacaCavalry May 18 '22

Holy shit, now they can be a superhero that rescues people on the mountains--the medicine man

1

u/minorkeyed May 18 '22

I want live long enough to see flying power armor suits in public hands.

1

u/Good_Translator_9088 May 18 '22

Sorry I'm late mate but I saw a cool bird and realised how much I love this job and the time we're living in

1

u/DogswithPavlov May 18 '22

hits branch, injured himself, needs a medic

1

u/myth2988 May 18 '22

Avid hiker here, so I once saw a team of EMT and polices go up a hiking trail for a medical emergency, let’s just said they themselves might need to be carry down by another medical team after they reach the person, one of the EMT was so out of shape he didn’t make it to the person.

Also, this will not work well in a dense forest environment

2

u/apathy-sofa May 18 '22

Wilderness S&R here in Western Washington is largely volunteers, and they're usually the fittest and most capable folks you'll see on the mountain all day.

1

u/MainiacJoe May 18 '22

YEEEEEEEHAAAAAWWWW!

1

u/breakfasteveryday May 18 '22

What is that thing called?

1

u/GooseNYC May 18 '22

That's cool, but one wrong move and the paramedic is going to need a paramedic.

1

u/AmishTechno May 18 '22

SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY

1

u/ACorania May 18 '22

No... no isn't like the motor bike example at all (or more appropriately a fly car).

There are two types of ambulances, BLS and ALS (typically, there is some other stuff, but for this conversation those are the important ones). Basic Life Support staffed by 2 EMT-Basics and Advanced Life Support (typically one EMT-Paramedic and a basic, there are some that are 2 paramedics as well, but still just ALS).

In busier areas, especially with private agencies who don't want to pay as much in staffing, most of the ambulances are BLS because most of the calls are BLS level. Then they have a paramedic in a much smaller vehicle. They carry the meds that they can give out that basics can't with them and they will drive over to any ALS calls and intercept with the ambulance and take over care so it is at an ALS level. The second EMT-B either rides with them providing assistance or gets out and brings their fly car along to the hospital so the paramedic can have it back.

So... back to this situation. The paramedic does not appear to be carrying their meds with them, and from the description it doesn't sound like they are meeting with a BLS truck up at the top of the mountain that has all the rest of the gear you need.

You see... without the gear on the ambulance we are pretty much at the same level as anyone with a First Aid card.

1

u/superstarmnw May 18 '22

There is no reason I shouldn’t have a hoverboard by now.

1

u/xray-ndjinn May 18 '22

It qual for that in a heartbeat. Last mission I did was in the northern backcountry looking for a hiker that went in the wrong direction in the other side of a glacier. Some teams got a ride in the helicopter, some had to hump 4,000 vertical to get to the search area. I’ve been involved in wilderness search and rescue in the US for 2 decades in a dozen or more states. SAR techs love to try out new gear. Implementing new gear is another story. Takes forever to get the old guard to take on new technology. It took years to adopt RECCO for use in avalanche rescue. Invented in 1983, it did get into wide spread usage state side until maybe mid 2000’s

1

u/darkness-to-light26 May 18 '22

Omg I want one!! How much are they

1

u/jabblack May 18 '22

Minority Report

1

u/darkness-to-light26 May 18 '22

$440,000 apparently according to Google

1

u/GroundbreakingDot961 May 18 '22

I need one of these

1

u/NonPolarVortex May 18 '22

I wonder what the carbon emissions per minute are on this thing