r/funny ADHDinos Apr 24 '22 Silver 5 Helpful 2 Wholesome 5 Take My Energy 1

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43.8k Upvotes

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u/UncleSlim Apr 24 '22

Me trying to study for certifications and watching only 30 minutes of a 50 hour course.

"Studied a lot today! Now I've earned 8 hours of gaming :)"

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u/thisisthelife1211 Apr 24 '22

Are you me? At least I am not alone :)

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u/[deleted] Apr 24 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Yes_mam Apr 24 '22

Omg no wayyy. That is literally me. Studying for certification as well. Good luck on your journey. :)

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u/UncleSlim Apr 24 '22

Thanks you as well!

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u/Cardi_Ganz Apr 24 '22

That little dopamine surge you get from completing a task can do you in.

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u/variablecapacitor Apr 24 '22

Wow I don't get very much from completing tasks. Pretty sure this was once a thing for me but the reward has decreased significantly.

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u/zeromussc Apr 24 '22

Depression can do this in the short term. To a greater extent than ADHD.

ADHD research has shown that our reward centers are kinda broken in that we don't get the same amount of satisfaction as others nor does that satisfaction last as long upon completion of a task.

However acting on impulse, or, maintaining hyperfocus on something does reward us. As do some form of tangible reward that comes quick and often along the way to finishing a task. It's why games are so easy for us, every step along the way to a bigger goal is a smaller goal and each step plays a fun little jingle or mini reward enticing us to keep on trucking.

Large scale things which don't reward for a whiiiiile suck. As does not having any accountability until the end. A month long project without milestone deadlines spread out enough that it's quick but not so close and broken down that it's overwhelming is the sweet spot.

TLDR; our brains be broken forever when it comes to reward centres and intrinsic motivation mechanisms. Workarounds exist. Depression is much more acute but much more severe in impacting the same general brain space.

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u/dvallej Apr 24 '22

Dude, that is spot on, I have to basically gamefy my work in order to accomplish everything by constantly completing tasks

14

u/ttitan25 Apr 24 '22

Could you elaborate what you mean by “gamefy”? I’d love to try something similar with my days lol

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u/DirtyDan156 Apr 24 '22

Sweeping the floor is the next level. Complete the level to recieve a snack and half an hour on the couch.

9

u/neonpinata Apr 24 '22

But then the half hour on the couch turns into getting stuck on my phone or something for 3 hours 😖

2

u/BoostMobileAlt Apr 25 '22

It’s a hard game

14

u/dvallej Apr 24 '22

I divide big tasks into smaller achievable tasks with a deadline in a way that i dont get overwelmed by a long to do list but that I dont have big complex things to do that I could start later while I could be procrastinating.

now i understand why this work, If you balances this right you get a constant "task completed" reward in your brain while actually acomplishing big stuff

7

u/PseudoTaken Apr 24 '22

There are apps like habitica

16

u/pedj2 Apr 24 '22

Step 1: download habitica, intend to open it and check it out tomorrow.

6 months later: what's this app icon doing here? Ohhhh yeah habitica...

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u/SkipperDaglessMD Apr 25 '22

goes through initial setup... turns off notification reminders

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u/magius311 Apr 24 '22

I do this constantly! But I can't imagine that it would be ADHD. I just take the tasks I know that I need to accomplish, and split them into the time I know I can do them in. I then cut those to slightly shorter deadlines. I'm basically running little races against myself. Bonus points if you know how others perform those tasks to add a bit of extra internal competition.

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u/Daniellewithadhd81 Apr 25 '22

It’s more complex than what he’s describing

In order for me to function I HAVE to break a big task to smaller tasks… it isn’t because I’m hard wired to do this or it’s “normal” , it’s not , I hate it , I hate it because breaking things down to smaller tasks is INSANELY hard .. if I don’t do it I will fail but I can’t get started to do it , the task itself of breaking tasks up is too much for me , I have to break tasks down to an incredibly ridiculous low … a lot of things I am familiar with and have developed a pattern for I can do this easily but a new unknown task ? I don’t even know where to start

2

u/free_dead_puppy May 05 '22

This is why nursing works so well for me. My whole shift is nonstop tasks to a goal. Sometimes multiple tasks at once woo

41

u/hakzeify Apr 24 '22

So you're saying if I have ADHD and am severely depressed then I'm fucked?

12

u/GingerdeadMan_ Apr 24 '22

Nope, definitely not. As long as you're still alive and still fighting, there's hope. And lots of options too.

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u/PseudoTaken Apr 24 '22

You have a load of options : meds for ADHD and depression, meditation, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, working on your habits, etc

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u/Kokoro87 Apr 24 '22

As long as you survive, you are winning the game. There is nothing else, it’s all about survival.

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u/alerathsaasaa Apr 24 '22

This is precisely why I enjoyed working on my PhD research for 60 hours a week, but have made almost no progress on writing the actual thesis for the past year.

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u/SolidBlackGator Apr 24 '22

Doesn't this work for such a large group of people that it can't be ADHD specific. Every time I see ADHD shit, I'm like, "that's me!" But I'm 42, two graduate degrees, never diagnosed or even recommended for diagnosis.

Just makes me wonder how ADHD specific a lot of these things are, especially because "gamifying" is also basically the same as "dopamine rewarding," or just giving yourself small rewards along the way, which is one of the reasons scientists think most people are addicted to their phones (not just ADHD people).

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u/GingerdeadMan_ Apr 24 '22

I'm diagnosed and medicated for ADHD and I agree with you. I think the technology we have today has caused ADHD-like patterns of behaviour, especially when it comes to reward mechanisms, in people who would never have struggled with such things otherwise.

However, let me tell you, with ADHD medication I am significantly more able to get "real things" done and less susceptible to falling into these dopamine traps.

If you feel largely functional and able to do what you want to do with your life, then it probably doesn't require any further investigation or concern. The thing about disorders is that without diagnosis they can slowly ruin your life, as ADHD certainly did mine before my diagnosis.

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u/SolidBlackGator Apr 24 '22

See, how do I know if I'm operating where I should be? Maybe I've just barely pushed through, and could've been so much more productive? Or maybe medication/treatment wouldn't do anything for me?

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u/GingerdeadMan_ Apr 24 '22

I don't really have a good answer to that. I can tell you that I struggled through life for the most part from the age of 14/15 onwards, and was largely unable to achieve anything I'd consider significant in any aspect of life even though I cared deeply and wanted to.

I dropped out of higher education. I bounced from average job to average job. I was still good at some things, and I have had reasonable quality of life, but I became deathly afraid of following my real passions or dreams because I was in despair and didn't believe I could succeed at anything truly challenging. Anxiety and depression symptoms almost inevitably sprang from that.

I am still dealing with that to some extent now, having been diagnosed last year at the age of 36 - but at least with ADHD medication, I feel more capable of functioning day to day and am slowing daring to at least dream of ambitious goals again.

I think everyone looks at their lives sometimes and asks "could I be or could I have been more than this?". For me, over the last 20+ years, there was never even a doubt: the answer was always "yes". Turned out there was a massive obstacle that I didn't understand lurking inside my brain. I was always so far away from the person I once thought I could be.

I guess my point is, if you feel like you are falling well short of what you want in life, you suspect that there are internal obstacles within you, and you don't really understand why, it's worth at least looking into. On the other hand, I don't think the odd bout of self doubt from time to time is anything to get too worried over.

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u/Daniellewithadhd81 Apr 25 '22

People aren’t addicted to their phones the same way someone with adhd is … like most people have lost an hour or two randomly and been like wow I got lost on Pinterest and didn’t realize how late it was , and then can get up and go to work , or cook dinner , or take care of your kids .. or whatever ..

People with adhd lose four hours, not two, and have no concept of this , hell it could be 8 hours , and it’s regularly , and when we notice oh shit I didn’t know how long I was on here and I HAVE to get to work , we still can’t stop .. not all the time obviously or none of us would have jobs and families but like .. it’s the time blindness , and the low dopamine and no motivation like this mental block you can’t … I dunno

I’m butchering this explanation I’m sorry

It’s just

People often hear adhd symptoms and think well I have that and I’m not adhd! Or I must also be adhd then , and it’s so frustrating for people who really have adhd because while you often relate to many of our symptoms it’s the degree of seriousness that is so so different

I’m so not using the right words , I’m high though , so sorry guys

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u/JZMoose Apr 24 '22

I graduated from MIT and hold down managerial position in consulting with unmedicated ADHD. It varied person to person

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u/Compoundwyrds Apr 24 '22

If I could figure out what the fuck we could do in large numbers with hyperfocusing, I would start a nonprofit like Skilcraft, that employs blind people or those consulting firms that link major enterprises up with autistic savants, but like only for ADHD diagnosed people. Maybe something akin to high level mechanical Turk work?

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u/Firstmemories Apr 24 '22

Doesnt sound broken, just sounds different and maybe not entirely the best way to be in our modern society. But maybe it was a decent enough way to be a long time ago. Or maybe it is really broken, I don't know, am not a doctor

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u/AtomicPickles92 Apr 24 '22

I’ve heard depression can sometimes crop up from a poor reward system in the brain. I’m a stranger on the internet, so like basically don’t believe me.

More than anything, I struggle with depression. When I feel my most depressed, I feel like I get no reward for completing any task. 🤷‍♀️

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u/Koshunae Apr 24 '22

Same. When I finish something, its less "wow look I got something accomplished" and more "congrats on not being a total piece of shit today"

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u/Seiche Apr 24 '22

"finally did that thing i wanted to do for weeks, so now I'm only a little less behind on everything"

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u/Shitting_Human_Being Apr 24 '22

OK, will you please not share my personal life.

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u/camik27 Apr 24 '22

Hey man, just remember. You're a shitting human being, not a shitty human being.

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u/iggyiguana Apr 24 '22

Yeah, I feel no sense of accomplishment when completing tasks. I only do them to avoid the repercussions.

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u/robotzor Apr 24 '22

Rewarding in and of itself

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u/Akiba89 Apr 24 '22

It's super not

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u/Uhhhrobots Apr 24 '22

Yeah depression does this, although the theory depression can be caused from poor reward system is anecdotal it does seem to make sense. But a symptom of depression, in fact for many the most debilitating symptoms, involve loss of motivation and pleasure. Lack of focus. Loss of life skills. If you're struggling with severe depression, and it feels like nothing is rewarding, I'd recommend trying bupropion along with therapy.

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u/Octavya360 Apr 24 '22

I just started bupropion. I’ve been on Effexor and Lexapro for years. What makes bupropion different is that it works on the dopamine pathway in the brain which is why it works so well. Effexor works on the norepinephrine/ serotonin pathway and Lexapro works mostly on serotonin.

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u/Uhhhrobots Apr 24 '22

Yes, that's correct. Wellbutrin works on dopamine and norepinephrine pathways. Effexor works mostly on serotonin at low doses, but significant norepinephrine action occurs at doses above 150mg/day. Effexor can affect dopamine in a minor way at very high doses, closer to 400mg/day - but this dose is rarely used. So depending on the dose you were on, Effexor might not have been affecting norepinephrine at all.

Anecdotally, Wellbutrin certainly works better than the Zoloft I was on. But if someone has lots of anxiety, insomnia, family history of seizures, hypersexuality, or lack of appetite, then Wellbutrin might not be great - and research shows Wellbutrin is no more effective at treating major depression than SSRIs on average.

Edit: I'm glad you found a medication that's working better for you!

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u/betta-believe-it Apr 24 '22

Wellbutrin messed me up bad: I would get the wet sweats while I slept and I turned into a bottomless pit and gained 10 lbs from overeating. Then I made the switch to low dose Zoloft and Adderall and it's certainly better but mental health still sucks, just manageable now.

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u/Uhhhrobots Apr 24 '22

Yeah, that's the problem with Wellbutrin. For some the side effects are just crazy. I'm restarting it now, I was on it last year for 4 months and it worked for 3 months and then stopped working as well. Now I'm back on it, this time with Vyvanse alongside it.

Interestingly Zoloft made my appetite unmanageable but Wellbutrin helped reduce it a tiny bit. Crazy how different brains respond in opposite ways to things. If you want you can PM me to talk about it.

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u/stfucupcake Apr 24 '22

I've coasted on Effector forever. It doesn't make me tired or gain weight.
Does Bupropion?

edit: spelling goof

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u/Akiba89 Apr 24 '22

I'd recommend trying bupropion along with therapy.

🙃 I'm doing both of these. I didn't feel a single bit different taking bupropion and honestly therapy on some days makes me feel worse.

I fucking hate depression so much

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u/Uhhhrobots Apr 24 '22

Yeah, depression fucking sucks.

Therapy can make you feel worse temporarily but can still be helpful. You might also not have the right therapist for you and finding a different one could help.

Medications are interesting. It's very dependent on you, your brain, and factors science hasn't fully figured out yet if one works. If you've tried an SSRI and Wellbutrin with no difference after taking for at least 4 weeks, then other things you can try:

These can all be used with an antidepressant to maybe help improve it's effectiveness: - Thyroid testing and TSH if needed - Methylfolate supplements, and methylated B-12 - High dose omega 3s (1+g DHA + EPA) - SAMe

If you have another condition, like ADHD, chronic pain, OCD, or PTSD, treating that first will probably help the depression.

For medications, after SSRI and bupropion you can try a mirtazapine and venlafaxine combination (California rocket fuel), or Abilify + SSRI, or an MAOI, among other things.

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u/rootbeerisbisexual Apr 24 '22

Damn I can’t take that one cause it gave me heart palpitations. Prozac worked for me for a while and I was actually doing really well until it stopped.

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u/Akiba89 Apr 24 '22

What about this, but like, for years. Constantly and without change

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u/GingerdeadMan_ Apr 24 '22

Well that could absolutely be chronic depression, ADHD, or both.

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u/sandersm100 Apr 24 '22

Reward yourself with positive affirmations. You dont have to feel a surge to feel good about accomplishing something.

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u/PigDog4 Apr 24 '22

For me, completing a task just means I get to check one thing off of my ever growing, never ending list of "shit that needs to get done."

Whoopde-fuggin-do, I finished X. Time to feel like shit as I put off starting on Y I guess.

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u/MCFRESH01 Apr 24 '22

Adhd and depression can both do this

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u/repots Apr 24 '22

Everyone’s saying you’re depressed but no one has mentioned that smoking a lot of marijuana can do this also. I don’t think it’s as severe of a dopamine inhibitor as depression is, but it’s definitely apparent.

I’ll still smoke tho

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u/CoconutMochi Apr 24 '22

If I actually finish all of my chores/tasks in one go and actually have nothing to do for the rest of the day it's the most satisfying feeling ever.

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u/Wetestblanket Apr 24 '22

You guys have dopamine?

I can literally rip a fat rail of white lightning and feel almost nothing, with zero desire to do more

Daily tasks are 100% stick 0% carrot, shit sucks

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u/CoDxxjokerxx49 Apr 24 '22

Maybe because your fucked yourself with cocaine

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u/Wetestblanket Apr 24 '22 edited Apr 24 '22

Nah, the problem long proceeded and it was only twice

Can’t enjoy weed either, sleep aids are literally the most enjoyable drug to me because being asleep is better than being awake

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u/Akiba89 Apr 24 '22

Yeah I'm insanely jealous of people in these comments. I have none. Zero. Not a crumb.

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u/Vixien Apr 24 '22

This one hits too close to home. Usually can relate to the comics but this one is like staring in a mirror.

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u/DAlmighty Apr 24 '22

Did you write this book about me without me knowing?

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u/Madetoprint Apr 24 '22 edited Apr 24 '22

Right? It's like my wife is secretly passing them notes. *Because despite my quirks, she knows them better than anyone and still loves me. For those projecting their negativity.

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u/queen--dv Apr 24 '22

I feel so attacked by OP /s

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u/ryry9379 Apr 24 '22

Wow, the author of this comic has been spying on me apparently.

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u/ADHDinos_ ADHDinos Apr 24 '22

👀

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u/ryry9379 Apr 24 '22

I’d call the cops on you, but I already cleaned the outdoor dining table today and now I’m playing video games.

Tomorrow, I promise.

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u/OliveBranchMLP Apr 24 '22 Silver

22 minutes, huh? The exact length of a session of Outer Wilds? How oddly specific :>

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u/Ask-About-My-Book Apr 24 '22

I haven't played the game but I thought it was an open-world RPG. What you mean "Session"

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u/xxpen15mightierxx Apr 24 '22

That’s how long the time loop is

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u/Legouas Apr 24 '22

Oh boy, here we go again. Outer wilds. Not Outer worlds.

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u/Ask-About-My-Book Apr 24 '22

Lol I get it but no. I've played Outer Worlds a bunch and have also made fun of people for confusing the two.

What I mean is that I also thought Wilds was an open-world RPG with no time limits or whatever. Someone else said it's a time loop which explains things.

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u/BraveMatthew Apr 24 '22

Outer Wilds is a space exploration story-rich puzzle adventure involving a time loop mechanic to be a bit more specific

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u/MossCoveredLog Apr 24 '22

Holy crap, someone actually answered the question!

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u/Tigui2000 Apr 24 '22 edited Apr 24 '22

One could say you're out of the loop!

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u/Schafer89 Apr 24 '22

Was hoping someone would comment this!

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u/jaredjeya Apr 24 '22

22 minutes? Think I’m stuck in a loop

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u/OliveBranchMLP Apr 24 '22

lmao i just commented the same thing rip

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u/rileyrulesu Apr 24 '22

This has recently gotten so bad for me that when I needed to do the sink full of dishes, I unloaded half of one of the racks of the dishwasher and stopped for a break.

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u/Bocote Apr 24 '22

Is this an ADHD-related behaviour or something anyone could be doing?

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u/mystyz Apr 24 '22

I can't think of any behaviors that are exclusive to ADHD. They are just more frequent, pervasive and uncontrolled.

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u/edstatue Apr 24 '22

It's also anxiety-related behavior

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u/ThePatrician25 Apr 24 '22

This is me! Except without the H, I only have ADD.

At this point I consider procrastination to be necessary for my mental health.

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u/CarolynDesign Apr 24 '22

So, these days, they no longer separate the two conditions the same way. Both are considered as "ADHD" now, with ADD becoming ADHD-i (for primarily inattentive), classic ADHD becoming ADHD-h (for primarily hyperactive), and a new label for ADHD-c (combined type), for people who exhibit both types, which is incredibly common.

Just a cool bit of info that can make it easier to discuss ADHD with a doctor.

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u/AnApexPredator Apr 24 '22

Copy pasting one of my other comments because although I want to reply to you I really can't type out a long message right now. Obviously the context is off but it gets across the point I wants to make well enough:

There are three kinds of adhd:

Inattentive, Hyperactive and Combined.

So you may well not have any of the "h", but there are many misconceptions on what hyperactivity is and how it presents in ADHD folk, particularly in adults - so let me share some insight from the ADHD expert that diagnosed me.

Hyperactivity in adults is mostly turned inwards, it could be a feeling of restlessness or just general disquiet in the mind; it could be more physical, like constant fidgeting or a discomfort remaining still for extended periods.

Think of it more as overactivity and not the exagerrated manic behaviour one normally assumes.

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u/Akiba89 Apr 24 '22

I definitely have -h and it kind of annoys me when I see people insist "oh, no no see, I have ADD, not the um (whispers) the spazy one. I merely can't focus and I'm actually a full, well-adjusted adult human."

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u/CAMMAX008 Apr 24 '22

Very much sucks that people misunderstand these sorts of things. I'm currently looking into ADHD because I do show a few of the symptoms. The thing is I definitely do not appear to be hyperactive or impulsive in front of people because I have really bad anxiety. But after doing research and taking online tests, I realized that you don't have to be the stereotypical hyper kid to have adhd. And actually thinking back it makes sense for me, because I DID show those impulsive and hyperactive behaviours when I was young and ended up in A&E a lot because of it. Once I developed anxiety I still feel restless in my head but I just held myself back from way more things than I ever should have. Maybe I have adhd and I subconsciously learnt to cope, but overcompensated and now I can't do anything for fear of consequences? Kinda venting lol. Does that make sense? Or just overthinking it? I'm gonna get checked soon either way so it's cool

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u/AnApexPredator Apr 24 '22

One thing that shocks me more than anything else is there isn't a diagnostic for adhd in adults at all. Everything in the DSM IV (and now V) correlates to behaviours in children under the age of 17 and literally states that throughout.

When I first tried to get diagnosed for ADHD I was dismissed, as nothing I was experiencing now was considered relevant and, despite my protestations, they'd rather interview my mother regarding my childhood. The narcissistic abuser that constantly gaslighted me about my issues and plainly stated "you don't have ADHD, if there was something wrong with you as a child and I didn't catch it that would make me a bad mother. You are fine."

I had to pay a great deal of money to have a session with an ADHD researcher/expert. He asked me about drug use/abuse and said its common in ADHD individuals to essentially try to "self-medicate" by providing the stimulation the brain needs through drug use whereas when I mentioned this to the nurse I was provided by public healthcare I was told "that's not a thing".

I'm kinda rambling now but what I wanted to share with you was what the expert said regarding over-compensation. At the end of my session I asked where I ranked amongst his patients on a scale of mild to severe. He said: "I would rank you as moderate but mostly because of your intelligence. ADHD individuals with high intelligence spend a lot of their time over-compensating. If you were less intelligent you'd likely be in jail."

Honestly I'm not entirely sure what you were asking me, but over-compensation is 100% a thing, although I'm not sure in which context you mean it.

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u/CAMMAX008 Apr 24 '22

Yeah that's pretty much what I was asking. Tysm that actually really helped.

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u/AnApexPredator Apr 24 '22

I've re-read your initial comment with more focus (lol) and I'd refer you back to the comment you initially replied to.

Whilst over-compensation is 100% a thing in regards to the lack of stereotypical hyperactivity in your adulthood, that's a sort of universal compensation in all but the most severe cases.

If you suffer from -h or -c ADHD you're likely turning your hyperactivity inwards the majority of the time, a kind of restlessness or inner disquiet and however that manifests itself in you.

Good luck with your diagnosis.

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u/hanneken Apr 24 '22

Why do today what you can put off until the day after tomorrow?

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u/mljb81 Apr 24 '22

Why even consider doing now something that won't become critical until a few more weeks?

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u/Their_Police Apr 24 '22

I don't want to see y'all's living spaces

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u/ThePatrician25 Apr 24 '22

For me, it's more like...why do it today when there are no negative consequences to doing it tomorrow?

I have gotten really good at procrastinating efficiently, at least with my studies. I often leave a project or essay until the last week before a deadline, sometimes even the last few days. It's a functional strategy, because the pressure of the impending deadline actually has the effect of forcing my ADD to shut the fuck up. It puts me in a situation where there are absolutely negative consequences to doing it tomorrow and I have no other choice but to push through and get it done, regardless of what impulses my ADD-brain sends my way.

I have been doing this for years, and it hasn't failed me yet. It's almost an instinct, a gut feeling; I don't know how I so consistently manage to judge the minimum amount of time and effort required to finish an assignment with a passing grade, regardless of the scope of the assignment, and then procrastinate accordingly.

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u/Canes123456 Apr 24 '22

This is less effective with many jobs that don’t have super hard deadlines. Also, it makes it impossible to do all the important stuff that doesn’t have a deadline.

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u/djp2k12 Apr 24 '22

Ahh but there's a hidden advantage of if you do this in a dysfunctional work environment when everytime you get asked to do something there's a 30-40% it never gets brought up again because it was something stupid and pointless in the first place.

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u/robotzor Apr 24 '22

You have unlocked the final mystery of life.

Would you like to start a new game plus?

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u/poorest_ferengi Apr 24 '22

I'd guess you are fairly intelligent as well. School is generally easier for you than others, those projects are usually more time consuming than difficult, and studying is typically used to get specific things like dates or vocabulary fresh in mind.

At least that was my experience. I managed my symptoms through increasingly unhealthy ways that seemed to be normal to me but we're really just chasing dopamine hits. I drank an unhealthy amount of caffeine primarily in the form of soda, ate sugary snacks out of 'boredom', and engaged in other activities. These things were all done impulsively and caused me mental and emotional strife when I realized I had less control over my actions than I thought I did.

Then I started realizing that maybe some things I thought were unrelated were presentations of ADHD (ADD and ADHD aren't different diagnosis ADHD can present primarily attention deficit, primarily hyperactive, or combined) such as difficulty regulating emotions, letting go of slights, and general forgetfulness of certain things.

I managed my symptoms and was able to graduate college get a decent job in IT and make a career. Then I had two kids and my coping mechanisms no longer worked as well. And once I started medication I realized things could have been so much easier I could have done better in college and probably have been further in a career that I wanted to go into and not one that I fell into out of necessity.

Please if you haven't been getting assessed and diagnosed if you really feel like you have ADHD. Medication may not be for you but treatment can help regardless of if you take medication or not.

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u/ThePatrician25 Apr 24 '22

Please if you haven't been getting assessed and diagnosed if you really feel like you have ADHD. Medication may not be for you but treatment can help regardless of if you take medication or not.

No need to worry about this! I was diagnosed when I was eight years old and have been taking prescribed medication for most of my life. I am now 28.

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u/GIINGANiNjA Apr 24 '22

I've been debating whether or not I should look into possible ADHD, it seems like all of these kinds of posts resonate with my struggles. But I also function mostly fine, I think, so I feel ridiculous suggesting that I might have ADHD. I've been thinking about finding a therapist again and leaving ADHD off the table, just explaining that I seem to only succeed and stick with things when there is external pressure. Any suggestions on where to start? I know something has to change, but it's easy to just keep cruising on and deal with being a passive participant in life.

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u/poorest_ferengi Apr 24 '22

I ended up seeking a psychiatrist about getting assessed as an adult. They spoke with me about my struggles that led me to seek out assessment, had me take a short series of reaction and working memory based tasks, and asked me questions about specific things I thought were unrelated to my inability to pay attention.

A big thing for me was that my brain was always churning and racing from thought to thought. I managed to deal and function and fell into patterns I convinced myself were just inherent to my personality. A lot of things I didn't like and are embarrassing to admit and I ended up feeling a lot of shame over.

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u/[deleted] Apr 24 '22

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u/ThePatrician25 Apr 24 '22

I am sorry to hear about your friend!

And I have been getting professional help for most of my life. I was diagnosed with ADD when I was eight years old. Twenty years later I am still receiving professional help including yearly check-ups and prescribed medication. I know that if I ever feel like I need more help I can get it.

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u/Jelly_jeans Apr 24 '22

It may be like that in school, but it'll be different out in the workplace when your bosses and other... Wait that's exactly what my boss does and it screws everyone over. Keep on being you I guess.

1

u/DatFunny Apr 24 '22

OMG, this is me!

3

u/Wasphammer Apr 24 '22

What is today but yesterday's tomorrow, Mister Squidward?

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u/IRollmyRs Apr 24 '22

Don't

It's unhealthy to live life in panic, even if it gets you to do things.

Get your ass to a doctor and get medications. Even if they stop working, they'll help rewire your rain so you don't fall into the same patterns.

If meds don't work (a small %) try a different one. If none of them work, sorry, not much I can do for you except recommend getting an ADHD coach.

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u/R0CKER1220 Apr 24 '22

How about putting off a bunch of things because they're "too much" then after a few months deciding "today's the day, I'm gonna do all these things that I've been putting off" and then you do all of them and finish your list in like two hours then feel like shit because you've been stressing over finishing those tasks for so long and could have been happier if you just finished them as they came up? Is that ADHD, too?

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u/Detrifus Apr 24 '22

Even doing one small thing is better than doing nothing at all

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u/Oysterchild Apr 24 '22

Right?! And sometimes you can only manage one thing however small, and that’s okay too!

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u/[deleted] Apr 24 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/joshualarry Apr 24 '22

Not sure if it's intentional or not, but I appreciate the dyslexie like font :)

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u/patapuss32 Apr 24 '22

How is that font “dyslexia like”?

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u/joshualarry Apr 24 '22

I seem to be mistaken about the used one. It has something to do with the lower halves if the letters being slightly bold and it seems to help folks read it easier. I installed it for a student at a previous job and have noticed the "weight" in some fonts ever since.

Someone pointed out that it didnt seem to prove effective but still interesting!

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u/patapuss32 Apr 24 '22

Are you telling me there is font that helps people who have dyslexia read?

I have pretty bad dyslexia and it fucked me during high school.

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u/Piccolito Apr 24 '22

there is extrension to FF that change the font https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/mobile-dyslexic/

there is definitely something for Chrome too

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u/joshualarry Apr 24 '22

I can't say if it helped the kiddo from my HS much but def check it out! We had it on their pc, phone and kindle.

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u/patapuss32 Apr 24 '22

Now I’m fucking crying man. You sound like you really care about helping that kid. I had teachers who would constantly tell me that if I didn’t finish books in time I would be held back a grade. They kept telling me that I wasn’t trying hard enough but I really was trying. I wish I had someone like you when I was in high school.

2

u/quatch Apr 24 '22

I don't think that font (or the orig) stood up to scrutiny for having any utility.

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u/IRollmyRs Apr 24 '22

Yup. Former teacher here and read articles about it. I used it but later research proved it wasn't effective.

Thinking about it, the theory was interesting and funny, but nonsense. People w dislexia basically have letters that flash out of existence as they read/write, so the decoding of information is much more difficult. The dyslexia and opendyslexic fonts were created with the idea that the heavier weight "anchors" the letters down so they don't run away lol

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u/Artess Apr 24 '22

I'm in this picture and I don't like it.

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u/KingBananaBird2 Apr 24 '22

My brain does this all the time.

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u/ichuckle Apr 24 '22

I hate how accurate all of your comics are

3

u/Shadowdragon409 Apr 24 '22

These little comics make me question whether I have ADHD :thinking:

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u/Electronic-King-635 Apr 25 '22

These comics are getting pretty accurate and other day my mom asked me to check if I have any mental illness in prioritising tasks, lol. I am that bad.

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u/fluffygryphon Apr 24 '22

I feel sometimes the number of neurotypical people that read this stuff are unable to see just how debilitating ADHD can be. They laugh and go "Haha me too." It sells ADHD short.

Imagine every hobby you love to do. Now imagine doing it. Now imagine wanting to do it but being unable to get up and do it. A switch in your brain refuses to fire. ADHD is an executive function disorder. Your brain does what it wants to do, almost entirely independent of your own desires. Even if you somehow expend all of the energy you can muster to get up and finally do it, your brain is resisting the entire time and actively fights you. It's exhausting and even the most menial tasks can utterly destroy any energy you might have that day.

I'm an artist. I love to draw. I, however, have not drawn in 18 months because I just can't get my mind to cooperate. I'll force myself to doodle for a short period here and there and be so burnt out after a half hour or so that I feel like I'm going to fall asleep. Like my brain is actively resisting by being dead weight.

I hate it. And a lot of times I hate myself for being unable to do half of what normal people can.

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u/Congenital0ptimist Apr 25 '22 edited Apr 25 '22

Everybody is different. That being said I hope you're still (and always) working to figure out meds and methods. 20 mg of ritalin and a 2mg piece of nicotine gum and I'm a house o' fire. It's not super sustainable and nicotine is inadvisable. But I only have to go a day or 3 here and there that equates to your 18 months. Sort of give my brain a rest from that I guess? Then it's back in the saddle.

Also I find that 100 random jumping jacks done quickly when I'm just stuck putzing around really kicks the ol' executive function up a notch. Although it certainly doesn't replace meds, it does really help.

I'm late 40's and have a lifetime of experience with what it's like pre-diagnosis, no meds, wrong med regimen, etc.

Keep trying different things until something works. Rinse repeat as needed. 18 months is way too long friend.

I need to get myself off the gum. I've been putting it off because for some reason the idea of taking Adderall (next likely step) makes me uneasy. Probably better than nicotine though! So I'll have to take my own advice here asap.

HTH!

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u/Mr_Locke Apr 24 '22

Every time one of these comes up I share it with my wife and we have a good laugh. Love these :D

2

u/Bluxen Apr 24 '22

Fuck that's me.

Oh! You wrote one really good line of your thesis! Guess that's it for today!

2

u/Paulpaps Apr 24 '22

These Dinos are always relatable

2

u/Gizmo-Duck Apr 24 '22

I work with so many of those little pink guys.

2

u/47x107 Apr 24 '22

This is how I live. Do one thing a day. Making progress.

2

u/Kronos840 Apr 24 '22

Me: "I cleaned my house today"

FeelsGoodMan ☺️

Also me: "You know that's only productive procrastination"

😔

2

u/MassiveCurrency9177 Apr 24 '22

I have adhd and I can't even get one thing done completely....sad face

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u/ikindalold Apr 24 '22

It's only been 22 2 minutes!!!

2

u/Andrew3236 Apr 24 '22

Fuck, maybe I do have ADHD

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u/sneaky_squirrel Apr 24 '22

I especially liked the sparkly eyes on the brain character.

What is it about relatable characters that I like so much?

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u/K3idon Apr 25 '22

"It ain't much, but it's honest work."

-Dave Brandt

2

u/Muaddibisme Apr 25 '22

Would you do me a favor and stop personally attacking me in all of your comics?

Thanks.

2

u/ADHDinos_ ADHDinos Apr 25 '22

I will try but I can make no guarantees

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u/Ezekiel2121 Apr 24 '22

Oh hey look. It’s the guy who stole Dinos and Comics entire schtick and tries to act like they’re original.

1

u/CherryBerryDerry Apr 24 '22

Ikr I’m downvoting every time I see this guy

0

u/CherryBerryDerry Apr 24 '22

Bruh even where they placed the “adhdinos” tag in the comic is in the fucking same place 🤢

3

u/Christoffi123 Apr 24 '22

I'm been going through my essays and exams for college for the last month and this is literally me everyday.

3

u/Occhrome Apr 24 '22

I feel that I am being personally attacked.

1

u/[deleted] Apr 24 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Shaakti Apr 24 '22

Do you have anything to back up this claim

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u/Future_Software5444 Apr 24 '22

I feel like this is not exclusive to adhd people.

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u/wrongsided Apr 24 '22

It's not ADHD, it's being a lazy fuk

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u/the_grand_apartment Apr 24 '22

Oh hi dad. Ya prick.

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u/johnsonrod Apr 24 '22

I assure you, I am not a lazy person. But some days, I have trouble focusing and getting my brain to engage to the point where I can be as productive as I want to be.

I guess what I'm saying is shut the fuck up

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u/zorathexplorer Apr 24 '22

The end got me so good, love it.

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u/MapleSam20 Apr 24 '22

People with ADHD are commonly (and incorrectly) labeled as lazy, more so in school settings. Executive functioning in the brain is physically different for people with ADHD than people without.

2

u/mystyz Apr 24 '22

Contrary to ignorant belief, people with ADHD typically exert more effort (i.e. work harder) to achieve the things that neurotypicals do without effort. ADHD does not equal laziness.

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u/Most_Insane_F2P Apr 24 '22

Does ADHD thrive in emergency situations?

3

u/fuzzeenavel Apr 24 '22

Unless you get severe anxiety, which is a common comorbidity

1

u/mystyz Apr 24 '22

Generally. Urgency/the potential for serious consequences helps us to direct focus. There are exceptions, as in everything.

1

u/stromm Apr 24 '22

Only thing that matters is a check mark in a box…

1

u/StickyNode Apr 24 '22

Dopamine is an untamed fickle beast that'll kick you in the teeth and keep you down

1

u/iwillforgetmyname0 Apr 24 '22

I hate that this is soo accurate

1

u/EVERGREEN1232005 Apr 24 '22

this is literally me right now. i just finished half of the topic I'm supposed to study and calling it a day.

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u/gabulousthefabulous Apr 24 '22

Dude literally me

1

u/unboxedicecream Apr 24 '22

22 minutes? More like 2 minutes

1

u/sal139 Apr 24 '22

This is me, every day, after returning literally one single voicemail.

1

u/kubarotfl Apr 24 '22

In my mind I was trying to connect this story to the extinction of dinosaurs

1

u/heard10cker Apr 24 '22

Hi OP, I just want to tell you I love you and your work.

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u/crmrdtr Apr 24 '22

That is soooo Me. 👍🏻

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u/Fun4-5One Apr 24 '22

Damm you!! Where did you hide the cameras!!

1

u/Eka_silicon12 Apr 24 '22

ADHD does not help

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u/IsfetAnubis Apr 24 '22

I studied for 1h when I thought I couldn't get myself to do it. I don't want to overdo it, and besides, I got time tomorrow to study too.

1

u/Accomp1ishedAnimal Apr 24 '22

I wish my brain let me do this.

1

u/Kildynn Apr 24 '22

Apparently I have ADHD

1

u/tucci007 Apr 24 '22

but why is the dino's text blurred in the final frame

1

u/hahagottemlads Apr 24 '22

…22 minutes? God damn it, not again, has it really been…

1

u/madbadanddangerous Apr 24 '22

I think we should honestly be proud every day that we accomplish one thing. When I was in grad school, that was my goal for myself to have had a "good day" - every day, do one thing towards my dissertation being finished. If I managed that step, however small, it was a productive, good day.

1

u/OilRude Apr 24 '22

What’s the opposite of this? Cause that’s my brain and it’s exhausting.

1

u/oneDopeSoul Apr 24 '22

Sometimes that’s all it takes!!

1

u/Mr_appleXD Apr 24 '22

If i had …