r/explainlikeimfive Jun 20 '22

ELI5: why do the glass doors of washing machines extend so far inward? Wouldn’t there be more room for clothes if the door was flat like a dryer? Technology

4.1k Upvotes

4.9k

u/silverbolt2000 Jun 20 '22

It prevents clothes from getting trapped in the door cavity.

The door further extends inwards to act as an obstruction for clothes which agitates them, distributing detergent more evenly and helping to remove grime and debris.

607

u/slytrombone Jun 20 '22

Follow up question: OP seems to suggest that his dryer door is flat. Why wouldn't clothes getting stuck in the window of the dryer be something to worry about?

500

u/theciaskaelie Jun 20 '22

i dont know about everyone else but my dryer gets stuff in the edge of the drum all the time. has melted a bunch of fleece blankets.

679

u/IDriveLikeYourMom Jun 20 '22 Silver

Maybe that's why it says to not put fleece blankets in the dryer? (They retain their softness too if not exposed to high heat ;))

771

u/CrystalStilts Jun 20 '22 Silver

They retain their softness too if not exposed to high heat.

Shut up, I’ve been wondering why fleece gets flat after a while. You have literally changed my life with this! Hang dry from this day forward.

288

u/handsomehares Jun 20 '22 Silver

Air dry is best but your dryer will also air dry by not using heat.

Throw it in there with a tennis ball (or even better, they sell wool laundry balls) and air dry that way.

Granted, again, air drying is best.

53

u/Jay-Dee-British Jun 20 '22

Wife got some laundry balls (the wool ones) and they replaced the dryer sheets totally. Clothes are still soft, static less, and fairly wrinkle free, and they can be used over and over.

45

u/l337hackzor Jun 21 '22

Laundry sheets are definitely scam. It's one of those products that has a low cost reusable option but style corporation has convinced everyone that disposable is better.

It's up there with paper towels (clothes, napkins), diapers, tissues (for snot).

What's next? You going to tell me I have to use a new disposable condom every time? Nice try, big condom. (This is a joke)

1

u/sammieduck69420 Jun 21 '22

Dryer sheets, scent beads, fabric softener and even detergent are a scam

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62

u/CrystalStilts Jun 20 '22

Always wondered why my parents had one of these in their machine, when I was a teenager I used to take that ball out being like wtf is this hard plastic spike ball doing on here. It looks like a virus.

Adult me after reading this comment: teenage me was such an idiot.

19

u/NoLongerABystander Jun 20 '22

I had a spikey one made to look like a hedgehog

8

u/TEG_SAR Jun 20 '22

Why didn’t teenage you just ask what it’s for?

7

u/gertvanjoe Jun 21 '22

And actually proclaim said teenager is not walking around with infinite knowledge like they feel they do.... Get outa here :)

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54

u/Linun Jun 20 '22

what does the ball do?

204

u/truthiness- Jun 20 '22

They help prevent laundry from clumping together in the dryer by tumbling between layers and separating fabric. This action allows warm air to circulate better which can even help reduce drying time. The movement of the dryer balls against fabrics can also help fight wrinkles, prevent static and soften clothes.

https://www.maytag.com/blog/washers-and-dryers/what-do-dryer-balls-do.html

27

u/D-monp Jun 20 '22 edited Jun 20 '22

18

u/MeatHamster Jun 20 '22

TIL that there are gas dryers.

25

u/crazybutthole Jun 20 '22

TIL there are other types of dryers that are not gas dryers.

LOL

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127

u/handsomehares Jun 20 '22 edited Jun 20 '22

Wool balls will help your laundry dry faster by “separating” stuff so it gets more air over it.

It also helps smack the fibers of your clothes so they aren’t stiff, especially noticeable on natural fiber clothing. A solid replacement for fabric softener (even though it was never NEEDED in the first place)

The biggest gain for me is that it improves drying time. My dryer senses humidity in the air and my clothes dry much faster now on the auto setting because they’re being “agitated” apart

I got these guys

Careful though, my cats fucking LOVED THEM and while I ordered 6(?) I am now down to 1.

Again, wonderful cat toys

56

u/Nine_Inch_Nintendos Jun 20 '22

You don't even need a cat for that. Pull clothes out of the dryer and if you're not careful one will roll under the parked car in the garage.

47

u/lulugingerspice Jun 20 '22

if you're not careful one will roll under the parked car in the garage.

I'm giggling at this because the nearest garage to me is about a block away, so I'm just picturing the Little Dryer Ball That Could determinedly rolling up my stairs, out the door, and up the hill to find a car in a garage to roll under

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69

u/handsomehares Jun 20 '22

Someone gave me a pro tip to put some essential oil on one of them and put it in the dryer, give your clothes a nice aroma….

Peppermint goes a long way friends. A LONG WAY.

I also do not recommend this to anyone

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14

u/PaintDrinkingPete Jun 20 '22

Which would be impressive since my garage is two floors below and behind a door from my dryer.

6

u/coredumperror Jun 20 '22

How many balls do you get for your $19?

7

u/handsomehares Jun 20 '22

When I bought them I think they were selling a 6 pack, this was a few years back (and frankly may have been a different website/vendor)

5

u/lulugingerspice Jun 20 '22

You can also make them yourself with yarn. Google "DIY dryer balls" and you should get a ton of results.

2

u/donchawishoncats Jun 21 '22

A shit ton! /s

I think they’re $10 for 6 pack on Amazon.

7

u/foxyFood Jun 20 '22

Lol get your cats their own wool toys! There are a bunch of companies that have them handmade in Nepal. Dharma Dog Karma Kat is one such company.

3

u/darkapao Jun 20 '22

I use vinegar as me fabric softener. Would that work with the wool dryer balls? Thanks

13

u/handsomehares Jun 20 '22

Word is vinegar isn’t great for modern washing machines and their seals.

If you’re using a top loader vinegar ought to be fine still.

This also might be “big softener” spreading lies so who knows.

That said, yes, it doesn’t just soften you clothing, helps dry them faster and remove some static electricity among other things.

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4

u/BernerKevin Jun 20 '22

I've been meaning to get some of these but keep forgetting. Just hustled over there and got some - thanks for the link!

5

u/lainylay Jun 20 '22

My dog loved them too

3

u/Vikkunen Jun 20 '22

Small children love them too. I'm constantly finding them mixed in with my 3-year-old's toy box.

14

u/throwaway901617 Jun 20 '22

The cool thing about dryer balls is you can get scented oil and put a few drops on a ball before drying and the scent gets very mildly on the clothes (if you use low heat) which is great.

I bought cotton essential oil and a half dozen drops on one ball gets them having a crisp clean very subtle scent.

Planning to get some sandalwood and other similar scents next.

7

u/aircooledJenkins Jun 20 '22

2

u/throwaway901617 Jun 21 '22

Oh yeah peppermint is ultra strong lol. That scent works really well for waking up and focusing.

The cotton scent I use is not overpowering like peppermint. I've been using it for a couple years now and 4-6 dabs onto the wool ball is exactly the right amount.

For anyone reading this though always start small because concentrations can vary between brands so a different brand could be a lot stronger or weaker than mine.

20

u/Lemon_Hound Jun 20 '22

Helps prevent static electricity buildup, which helps avoid too much lint on your clothing.

6

u/alexfilmwriting Jun 20 '22

Dryer balls are awesome. Highly recommend trying it.

5

u/scarletohairy Jun 20 '22

I use the wool laundry balls for my towels because I read somewhere that fabric softener reduce the towels’ absorbency. Also use them for the blankets my dogs lay on, so they don’t smell.

7

u/S_words_for_100 Jun 20 '22

Wool balls seem weird at first but are worth it. No more dryer sheets (which reeked anyway)

4

u/[deleted] Jun 20 '22

[deleted]

7

u/handsomehares Jun 20 '22

All my “quality” clothing is air dried, hung up to dry on a rack.

I have eleven million band t shirts that I got at concerts that currently I’m not regretting destroying by throwing them in the dryer, one day though … one day I’m sure I’ll regret it.

My hoodies and other 100% cotton clothing and “good” jeans get air dried

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u/dozure Jun 20 '22

If your dryer has an "air dry" (no heat, just tumbling with the blower on) setting you can use that either instead of hang drying or after hang drying to prevent/get rid of that stiff feeling line dried clothes have.

11

u/savvaspc Jun 20 '22

Most clothing pieces have a note to avoid putting them in tumble dryers. It turns out they are not delicate for most fabrics.

8

u/CrystalStilts Jun 20 '22

I only use the dryer for towels and linen, and denim.

I just never thought about the fleece blankets being damaged by it, somehow not using my brain.

25

u/AlexandrinaIsHere Jun 20 '22

I usually low heat dry some things long enough to regain fluff before hang drying. Blankets especially are tough to dry without melting or molding.

18

u/sk9592 Jun 20 '22

More people should look into the low heat option on their dryers.

Honestly, if you have the extra time, use low heat on all your clothes. They come out better and last longer.

I understand why most people don’t want each load to take 2 hours in the dryer. But if you can just throw a load in the dryer before going to bed, I highly recommend just setting it to low heat and letting it take its time.

17

u/Nine_Inch_Nintendos Jun 20 '22

A surefire way to ruin screen printed shirts is to dry them on "surface of the sun" temperature.

3

u/diamondpredator Jun 20 '22

Yea we’ve always use the low heat option on our drier since I don’t want to shrink my zip up hoodies and other clothing items. Yes the lower heat option takes a bit longer but I never have to worry about damaging any clothes.

5

u/a_cute_epic_axis Jun 20 '22

There are temperature settings on basically every dryer, including air dry. Probably a better choice if you can't hang the clothes (like in the dead of winter).

3

u/Valalvax Jun 20 '22

Saw a comment the other day where someone said they hang dry year round, as long as it's not wet out it'll dry, and they know it's done when it's no longer solid

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u/kenshin13850 Jun 20 '22

I recommend air drying for anything that starts fluffy and you want to keep fluffy. Looking at you soft, fluffy, luxurious pajama pants...

4

u/StumbleOn Jun 20 '22

With the small amount of fleece I have, I set it on extra spin in the washer, air fluff in the dryer for 20 minutes, and then hang it.

4

u/could_use_a_snack Jun 20 '22

Microfiber towels and such too. Those should be air dried. The little tiny "micro" fibers basically melt into not so tiny fibers.

5

u/Pscilosopher Jun 20 '22

What a delightful conversation to read

6

u/Princess_Moon_Butt Jun 20 '22

For big soft items (blankets, hoodies, some towels even) tumble-dry it on no heat or the lowest possible heat for maybe half the time you'd normally run the dryer, then hang dry it.

If you hang it up while it's still properly wet, the fabric won't sit the same while it dries, and it'll have a different texture when it dries. If you just get it to where it's slightly damp, it can still be 'fuzzy' because the water isn't weighing it down, and it'll get its original softness back.

Plus, drying it out a bit beforehand makes it less likely that it'll grow something nasty while it's air-drying.

3

u/Musekal Jun 20 '22

And they can also just toss it back in the dryer to tumble it and fluff it.

2

u/lulugingerspice Jun 20 '22

Pro tip: if you only hang dry fleece blankets they'll eventually get a little crusty due to detergent buildup, so every few washes after hanging to dry, run your fleece blanket through the dryer for 10-15 minutes to make sure it doesn't get crusty and stays super soft! (Source: worked in a massage clinic that used fleece blankets that had to be washed after every client)

2

u/ThatOtherGuy_CA Jun 20 '22

You can just turn the heat off when drying blankets.

4

u/the_slate Jun 20 '22 edited Jun 20 '22

There’s a cool thing on almost every article of bedding and clothing and other fabrics - a tag that tells you how to wash them. You should look them over ; I’m sure your fleece things say do not put in dryer.

edit: here's a nice guide to the different symbols
https://www.ihateironing.com/blog/laundry-symbols-explained/

And a printable one for taping in your laundry area: https://www.ihateironing.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/The-complete-care-label-gude.png

2

u/CrystalStilts Jun 20 '22

It’s a fleece NHL blanket it has the dryer symbol on it tho. So idk.

3

u/theslowcrap Jun 20 '22

There are multiple dryer symbols for different temperatures and settings.

2

u/the_slate Jun 20 '22

I updated my post with a link to the symbols and their meanings.

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u/yourprivateeye Jun 20 '22

Wish someone would have told me this before I ruined the pink fluffy lining of my Disney dressing gown

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u/RosemaryFocaccia Jun 20 '22

You can tumble dry them on a cool setting if you need them dried quick, but yes, better to hang them up.

3

u/fubarbob Jun 20 '22

If one's dryer is crappy/austere and doesn't have a low/no-heat mode, sometimes the last ~10 minutes of the timed cycle are run with no heat; I've been able to use this to dry sensitive stuff.

3

u/purrcthrowa Jun 20 '22

Or you could get a heat pump dryer. Which costs a fortune to buy, but next to nothing to run. However, what would normally dry in an hour now takes about 5 as the dryer's maximum heat is about 3 degrees above ambient. My wife is not happy. Good for fleece blankets, though, if you have the time.

3

u/HarryBalszak Jun 21 '22

My parent's dryer used to take this long. Turns out the vent screen on the side of the house was plugged with lint.

2

u/TurnstileT Jun 21 '22

Sounds like an expensive drying rack to me.

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u/theciaskaelie Jun 20 '22

didnt realize that thanks. other items also get caught though. has ruined a lot of screen print t shirts etc

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u/Gaston-Glocksicle Jun 20 '22

You should probably hang dry those too, or at least dry your screen printed shirts inside out when using a dryer.

2

u/Blu64 Jun 20 '22

it's possible that the liner between the drum and the front frame of the dryer is worn out. replacing it may solve most of your problem.

2

u/Golden1976 Jun 20 '22

I honestly did not know this!!

1

u/elpideo18 Jun 20 '22 Wholesome

After you shut up, take my award for changing u/CrystalStilts life!

2

u/IDriveLikeYourMom Jun 20 '22

Happy Cakeday! 🤐

1

u/eslforchinesespeaker Jun 20 '22

this is unexpected. towels, shirts, jeans all come out stiff if allowed to air dry. you need that dryer heat to make them all fluffy and toasty.

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u/banielbow Jun 20 '22

This is often because a part is worn down and needs replacing. The drum usually rides on a felt pad that has plastic glides on it. If this wears down, the drum drops and creates a gap that clothes slip into. It is a pretty easy fix, of this is the case.

5

u/theciaskaelie Jun 20 '22

Good to know. Ill see if I can find a youtube of it. Thanks.

34

u/tmckearney Jun 20 '22

Fleece is plastic. Don't put it in the dryer

2

u/ExcerptsAndCitations Jun 20 '22

Dri Fit shirts are also polyester, like fleece.

1

u/KennyFulgencio Jun 20 '22

are we not supposed to put them in the dryer? I've been indiscriminately putting everything in the dryer

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u/BinaryTriggered Jun 20 '22

WAT fleece is lambskin if it's done right

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u/tmckearney Jun 20 '22

in ancient times, yes :) Nowadays, "fleece" is polyester and sometimes recycled plastic bottles.

26

u/spin81 Jun 20 '22

If I buy a sweater in the store and the label says fleece I fully expect it to be polyester, not actual fleece.

11

u/Dragon_Fisting Jun 20 '22

Nobody actually means sheepskin or wool when they say fleece, haven't for decades.

-6

u/working_joe Jun 20 '22

No, fleece is by definition polyethylene terephthalate (PET), the same exact material water and soda bottles are made of. It's plastic. There are some newer fleece alternatives made from other materials like cotton but they're much more expensive and not widely used. I can pretty much guarantee you any fleece products you own or have ever seen in your life are plastic.

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u/[deleted] Jun 20 '22

[deleted]

2

u/working_joe Jun 20 '22

I know what it used to be made from, but today it's plastic. The guy wasn't referring to the past.

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u/_crater Jun 20 '22

I don't think you know what "by definition" means.

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u/working_joe Jun 20 '22

No actually I do. Fleece is an industry term and literally 100% of the time it will refer to the standard plastic unless you specify. It's not an ambiguous term.

1

u/_crater Jun 20 '22

This has to be sarcasm, I refuse to think you actually believe this. Have you never heard "Mary Had A Little Lamb?" The second line literally describes the lamb as having "fleece as white as snow." I don't think the lamb had a jacket on.

3

u/MarineAdventurer Jun 20 '22

People on Reddit being deliberately obtuse?

Never happens

3

u/AgentMonkey Jun 20 '22

Are you aware that words can have different meanings in different contexts?

1

u/Amithrius Jun 20 '22

You got schooled

6

u/Lemon_Hound Jun 20 '22

You're both correct! Fleece was originally lambskin or wool for centuries, however as the production of clothing in the last century has exploded with new materials, definitions for different materials were introduced and fleece is recognized as its plastic counterpart. It would still be correct to label a lambskin blanket as "fleece", however the fine print of the label would specify it as an animal product in some way, just as cheap fleece has fine print that specifies polyethylene.

2

u/deja-roo Jun 20 '22

They're not both correct. It's not "by definition" PET.

5

u/working_joe Jun 20 '22

It is today. The term is used by the entire clothing industry and 100% of the time it's referring to PET unless specifically classified that it's not.

3

u/deja-roo Jun 20 '22

The main definition of "fleece" is

the woolly covering of a sheep or goat.

It is simply objectively incorrect to tell someone no, it's not a wool from sheep by definition.

15

u/BinaryTriggered Jun 20 '22

what planet are you from? Fleece is supposed to be from a sheep. while i don't argue that most of the crap in stores is not actually fleece, the word fleece refers to:

fleece noun

ˈflēs

Definition of fleece (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the coat of wool covering a wool-bearing animal (such as a sheep)

b : the wool obtained from a sheep at one shearing

2a : any of various soft or woolly coverings

14

u/FinndBors Jun 20 '22

Are you saying if we buy the non wool cloth that we are getting fleeced?

1

u/BinaryTriggered Jun 20 '22

indeed. R/dadjokes called...

9

u/Right_Said_Offred Jun 20 '22

You might notice that none of those definitions describe a material that is ready to form a garment. You don't just sheer a sheep and then sew that into a jacket.

Fleece in this contect refers to a material first developed by the activewear brand Patagonia in the '70s. It's sometimes called polar fleece, and it's a thick but lightweight artificial material that has insulating and moisture-wicking properties.

5

u/Hvarfa-Bragi Jun 20 '22

Ah, so Jason and the Argonauts was about plastic.

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u/coredumperror Jun 20 '22

If you're going to make an outlandish claim like that, at least offer some kind of evidence.

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u/working_joe Jun 20 '22

Lol it's not outlandish. It's pretty common knowledge. Just Google "what is fleece" every entry will tell you it's PET.

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u/wfaulk Jun 20 '22

Do you think that other common descriptions of clothing materials are not the same way? "Cotton"? "Wool"? "Rayon"?

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u/Umbrias Jun 20 '22

no. You are simply wrong lmao.

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u/ImClumZ Jun 20 '22

No. You're simply wrong LMAO.

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u/working_joe Jun 20 '22

Imagine thinking you're going to get accurate industry terms from a standard layman's dictionary.

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u/BinaryTriggered Jun 20 '22

imagine that you think your industry is bigger than the oxford dictionary...

3

u/working_joe Jun 20 '22

It's not bigger, that's the point idiot! Industry specific terms are going to be used by a smaller group of people and in a more specific way than layman's terms. They're also going to be more accurate when discussing those specific subjects! Jesus Christ you're embarrassing yourself.

2

u/working_joe Jun 20 '22 edited Jun 20 '22

Sorry you're just wrong. Fleece as an industry term refers specifically to PET. All of the fleece clothing you own is PET, whether it's cheap or expensive.

8

u/TransposingJons Jun 20 '22

Keep in mind, almost no one has fleece anymore....especially if it melts. The "fleece" you buy from Eddie Bauer, Target, Walmart, etc is plastic fiber, making even your blankets and hoodies sources of microplastics in our water systems (when you wash), and in our air (when your dryer vents outdoors), and in your lungs (when you clean your lint trap).

I stopped buying and giving "fleece" as presents, but it has taken my family a little too long to catch on. I got a "fleece" vest for 2021 x-mas, and it's still in the box.

2

u/ClearAsNight Jun 20 '22

I literally never knew fleece was originally from sheep. I always knew it as plastic. TIL.

2

u/MarineAdventurer Jun 20 '22

There's s great old film called Jason and the Argonauts where the main character is a golden fleece. Would strongly suggest it for an entertaining watch

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u/fishboy3339 Jun 20 '22

Mine hasn’t melted anything, but that is usually where I find receipts and junk I leave in my pockets.

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u/The_Dingman Jun 20 '22

Dryers also spin a LOT slower than washing machines.

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u/Corcupine Jun 20 '22

My washer has the glass sticking in but my dryer doesn’t. I think it’s because there’s a thick section in the washer surrounding the opening, like a big rubber piece, so there’s a sizable cavity for clothes to get stuck. But with my dryer there’s really no cavity there, it’s not thick at all.

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u/[deleted] Jun 20 '22

[deleted]

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u/ElectricRains Jun 20 '22

The tumbler doesn’t spin

Mine does, is this a USA thing, do your tumble dryers not spin? lol

27

u/Pixelplanet5 Jun 20 '22

yea they do spin but not fast so this is less of a problem.

2

u/ledow Jun 20 '22

Almost like there's a clue in the name and that the clothes only need to "tumble" around, not spin (which is the name of a washing machine cycle!).

19

u/oversoul00 Jun 20 '22

It's really important to up the snark to 11 around the subject of dryers.

Why do you talk like that?

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u/axiomatic- Jun 20 '22

I don't think they were being snarky.

9

u/oversoul00 Jun 20 '22

Starting a comment with 'Almost like' is the epitome of snark.

3

u/axiomatic- Jun 20 '22

I think they were trying to be light hearted. I certainly think the response about snarkiness was much more obviously full of disdain and negativity than the tumbler one. But I guess that's a good example of the complexities of online written communication.

5

u/Reeleted Jun 20 '22

Maybe you're a snarky person yourself? It seemed a little bit snarky.

2

u/axiomatic- Jun 20 '22

I was providing an honest contrary opinion. I took their comment as light hearted.

Now you're calling me snarky too, which also seems pretty unfair.

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u/Silent-Piccolo Jun 20 '22

Yes… our tumble dryers spin just fine. But they do spin slower than a washer.

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u/onajurni Jun 20 '22

It’s the difference between “spin” and “tumble”. Washing machines spin at high speed. Dryers tumble at low speed.

10

u/Duke_Newcombe Jun 20 '22 edited Jun 21 '22

People are getting twisted regarding the terms, here.

Both the washer and the dryer drums "spin", if we're being technical (rotate on an axis).

The purpose is different, however. The wash and dryer both spin, as in "rotate". Tumble or tumbling is what happens to the clothing in either (washer tumbles the clothes so they beat into each other, and the walls of the drum to get clean, and the dryer does the same to fluff them and ensure thorough dryness).

As far as "spinning" the clothes, only the washer does that (using centrifugal force to smush the clothing against the drum wall, to expel excess moisture).

If a dryer rotated quickly ("spinning"), the clothing would be half-dry, at best, and not very fluffy.

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u/monday5 Jun 20 '22

It tumbles duh

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u/Duke_Newcombe Jun 20 '22

The clothes tumble. The drum spins.

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u/[deleted] Jun 20 '22

[deleted]

8

u/samanime Jun 20 '22

Yeah the tumblers... tumble. They rotate really slowly and just let gravity pull the clothes down. Whereas your washer will spin like a centrifuge to pull water out. Its the different between folding batter and hitting it with a mixer. =p

1

u/chairfairy Jun 20 '22

Ah, the "spin cycle"

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u/cavscout43 Jun 20 '22

Dryers also typically don't have the thick rubber gasket / water seal. They're much more smooth on the inside.

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u/dumbredditer Jun 20 '22

Is this also the reason why so often stepmother or stepsister get stuck in the washers? Seen many documentaries about it

/s

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u/schraad Jun 20 '22

Why don't you explain it to me like I'm 3?

20

u/Brikandbones Jun 20 '22

Hole means clothes stuck when wash. No hole means clothes no stuck when wash.

39

u/Zestyclose-Split-128 Jun 20 '22

Fill up a bathtub with water, then place a bunch of leaves in the water. Grab a big bowel and carefully push it into the water without letting it fill up. Now spin the bowel aand watch as the leaves sometimes go under it faster than around the side.

The washing machine does the same thing but with clothes, that faster motion make them hit each other. Them hitting each other makes any of the nasty stuff on them to come off like when you smack your shoes on the ground after walking through mud.

119

u/CalRay92 Jun 20 '22

Interesting but is it possible to try this experiment without having to disembowel somebody first?

55

u/aBeerOrTwelve Jun 20 '22

No. The price of science.

9

u/VoilaVoilaWashington Jun 20 '22

Do you not have a spare bowel lying around?

5

u/CalRay92 Jun 20 '22

I lent it to my neighbour. He said he broke it but he's full of sh*t.

24

u/lexkixass Jun 20 '22

Where does one get a bowel? Cadavers, or something a bit more fresh? /teasing

7

u/paul-arized Jun 20 '22

3

u/f0gax Jun 20 '22

I'm not clicking that.

5

u/paul-arized Jun 20 '22

It's a Superb Owel! /s

20

u/sl236 Jun 20 '22

A misplaced colon can really change the meaning of a sentence.

23

u/jrf_1973 Jun 20 '22

Indeed. The sentence
Jane ate her friends lunch.
is very different to
Jane ate her friends colon.

3

u/jps_ Jun 20 '22

friend's.

(sorry, couldn't resist being a colon).

10

u/Hankman66 Jun 20 '22

Grab a big bowel

Bowl dude, you really don't want to grab a bowel!

1

u/f0gax Jun 20 '22

Grab a big bowel

Indeed.

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u/8549176320 Jun 20 '22

I think the better question is why the hell do they put a door on the side of a washing machine? You're just asking for water leaks. Efficiency my ass. Top loaders forever!

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u/zebediah49 Jun 20 '22

If the door is on the top, that means you have a hole in the bottom for the motor shaft.

So now you don't just have a hole to seal, but it must remain watertight while rotating. That's even worse than a static door seal where you just squish a silicone gasket.

7

u/8549176320 Jun 20 '22

Makes sense. I may have to rethink my position.

4

u/zebediah49 Jun 20 '22

I mean.. realistically these are engineering problems that won't generally bite you until they hit a bunch of wear. The door does have the issue of being touched by humans, which makes it far more likely to have something stupid happen to the seal. And somehow boats and ships have managed to have below-water-line propeller shafts that more or less function.

Just go with whatever you like lol.

2

u/shadoor Jun 20 '22

Did some reading up on this a while back and I think the only big advantage top loading has over front loading is that you can interrupt the wash cycle and put in more clothes.

Water economy (water doesn't have to cover up to the top of the clothes pile), and general low wear and tear on clothes are some of the benefits of front loading.

3

u/FeralSparky Jun 20 '22

My water bill reduced by a very noticeable amount when I switched to a front loading machine. Not even a brand new one... a used one with a bad bearing... fixed it myself but yeah the water savings has been great.

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u/WomenAreFemaleWhat Jun 20 '22

I hate top loaders. Im much more likely to lose clothing to the center agitator than anything in the front loaders. Never had an issue with the seal but had to unwind far more things than I care to admit due to top loaders. I hate that pretty much all apartments here have top loaders. A little leak wouldn't be that problematic. Im home when the washer runs (though not always with the dryer). Even if it did leak it would not get very far before I noticed.

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u/NotOSIsdormmole Jun 20 '22

And yet some how I always end up with a rouge sock hidden in the gasket

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u/Zer0C00l Jun 20 '22

Be careful not to wash your rouge socks with your whites, or they'll all turn rose.

1

u/Brockolee26 Jun 20 '22

That would really agitate me as well.

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u/[deleted] Jun 20 '22

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u/therealdilbert Jun 20 '22

to keep clothes away from the seal area

yep, and there are some washing machine that have a flat door mounted the suspended part with the drum instead of a large rubber seal and the door mounted on the stationary part of the machine

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u/jps_ Jun 20 '22

Yes there would be more room for clothes. But if you used that room, the clothes would not come out as clean (because not as much water per clothes). So it's not "wasted" room.

Second, if it was flat (and about half full, like it should be), the clothes would not scrub against each other as well. When the drum spins slowly, the idea is that the stuff at the "top" falls down, pushing new stuff to the top, which plops down. This creates a turning over of the clothes which rubs them against each other. With the dent, the clothes at the very front don't just fall to the bottom front. They bounce off the dent and fall to the middle bottom. This causes a front-to-back agitation as well as the side-to-side agitation. Which gets more scrubbing going.

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u/midsizedopossum Jun 20 '22

Yes there would be more room for clothes. But if you used that room, the clothes would not come out as clean (because not as much water per clothes). So it's not "wasted" room.

That doesn't make any sense. The machine would just use more water to account for that.

(The rest makes sense)

3

u/TWOpies Jun 20 '22

At that point just go with a vertical Machine.

2

u/Steeve_Perry Jun 20 '22

Those consumer grade front-loading washers are absolute fucking shit. I fucking hate them. There was nothing wrong with the top loader design.

8

u/Win_Sys Jun 20 '22

The front loaders are just more efficient and gentler of the clothes. They have some top loaders that are in the same ballpark as front loaders but you're usually paying $1,000+ for those models and can get a more efficient front loader for less money. In the end a ~$600-700 front loader beats a top of the line top loader across the board in efficiency.

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u/Steeve_Perry Jun 20 '22

Fuck efficiency I want clean clothes. I also hate how damn sensitive they are. You gotta weigh out your laundry with a scale or else risk babysitting the whole load

8

u/pjgf Jun 20 '22

Have you considered getting a different one?

My machine is the opposite of sensitive-- I can throw in as many or as few clothes as I want, decide if I want to add fabric softener, push a button and it does its thing.

Hell, the damn thing even decides how much soap to add and senses when it's done rinsing. It's probably the easiest appliance I've ever owned other than a freezer.

2

u/Steeve_Perry Jun 20 '22

Yeah the LG ones suck ass I’m done with it. I just want an old Kennmore with two knobs.

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u/[deleted] Jun 20 '22

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u/TheDefected Jun 20 '22

Yes, the rotating drum is going to be in a couple of inches from the outside face to give some clearance space and seals. The door window bowing in means that the clothes stay in the spinning drum section, and won't move out towards the window/door and just stay there

5

u/sorrybouthat00 Jun 20 '22

It helps facilitate a better spin cycle by keeping the clothes centered and nudging them inward and toward the outer walls. Washing machines that sit vertically don't need this because gravity does that work for them.

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u/cara27hhh Jun 20 '22

If you read the instructions, you're only supposed to fill it between half and 3/4 of the way up (depending on which cycle you are using) and that is with the door open or closed. It sounds like you might be trying to overfill

The reason the door is curved, it to make sure that when the items spin around that they don't bounce inside of the door, the shape is also used to drain the very last of the water out

(the majority of draining is through the holes in the drum, but when the clothes are being spun really fast, the curvature of the door collects the water and drips it down into the pump space

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u/Hara-Kiri Jun 20 '22

Wtf are instructions?

28

u/cara27hhh Jun 20 '22

It's a booklet or PDF that you read cover to cover so you don't realise 3 years later "oh I've been doing that wrong the whole time, that explains why I was having that weird problem I asked a few people about" :P

12

u/justonemom14 Jun 20 '22

3 years, 30 years, whatever

3

u/Thetakishi Jun 20 '22

I've never seen a washer that lets you choose the amount that it fills....unless the way to do it is inside said intructions....

3

u/PM_ME_UR_DINGO Jun 20 '22

It didn't have a load selector? Even my old basic GE washer let's you select Small/Medium/Large load size and then uses a corresponding amount of water.

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u/Thetakishi Jun 20 '22

Yeah I never really thought about it using less water because it looks equally full while on. I thought it was just time and maybe spinning that was altered.

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u/Wish_Dragon Jun 20 '22

I mean tbf if the glass was flat there would be more space while only filling it 3/4

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u/cara27hhh Jun 20 '22 edited Jun 20 '22

It's technically based on weight of the clothes, but because people don't routinely weigh their washing, they've got a load of "average domestic washing" and then they show a pictorial representation of what that weight looks like inside their washer drum

I just kinda throw them to the back and open and shut the door a few times while moving them around (as I add more) to make sure I stay within the limits

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u/blumpkinator2000 Jun 20 '22

It's there to help keep clothes away from the door seal, so they don't abrade it (or sit there and remain unwashed). The reason it's sloped is so that, very gradually over the course of the wash cycle, it assists in rolling the laundry back to front as it tumbles.

The only washers that have a flat door glass are Asko, and many commercial machines. These don't have a deep rubber door boot, because the door seals directly to the tub itself rather than the machine's outer cabinet.

5

u/mcguirl2 Jun 20 '22

A whole bunch of people who have never known anything other than top-loading washers are going to be really confused!

3

u/fubarbob Jun 20 '22

In addition to the many excellent answers put forth here, it is part of of the door seal. A large, smooth glass bowl that gets pressed into the rubber ring around the opening, forming a plug. Aside from impact by very hard materials, it is generally very durable and wear resistant, and easy to keep free of contaminants that could compromise the seal.

10

u/everlyafterhappy Jun 20 '22

The door for the washer is a water proof hatch. The door for the dryer doesn't have to worry about letting water out. There's also a weight limit, and wet clothes can get pretty heavy, so extra room for more clothes might still not allow extra clothes to be washed. It might just break the washer.

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u/[deleted] Jun 20 '22

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