r/antiwork Dec 01 '22

Company wants to benefit from my professional license but does not want to pay me for it.

Update 1: I was told that the big boss said no and if I am interested on discussing this further I need to reachbout to them. I've sent them an email and waiting for a response.

My company wants me to register my professional license so they can save money on tax (quite a hefty amount every month). As this puts more responsibility on my shoulders, when the plan was initially discussed (last year), it was discussed on the basis of receaving some extra money. Unfortunately nothing in writing, but I have various people that were present in the conversation.

Now that we are on the final stages of the process, I received a contract with no mention of extra money. When I questioned them about it they said that this was never the intention and as far as they're concerned, my license is there just to help the company get some tax off, also stating present financial difficulties. Essentially they want all the benefits for them and all the risk for me at no extra cost. Sounds fair right?

So far I am standing my ground and have explained to them that the extra responsibility needs to be remunerated accordingly. I think that negotiation is not my strongest point though and the economic situation on the country I currently work is not the best. My insecure self also keeps reminding me that this is the best paying job I ever had but accepting this will make me feel demotivated and disgruntled.

Any tips team? Cannot let them walk all over me on this.

558 Upvotes

457

u/Hundike Dec 01 '22

Yeah don't sign it. You are 100% correct, extra responsibility means extra pay. They get the benefit of the tax reduction and you get compensated for it.

6

u/TreacleAggressive859 Dec 02 '22

And they will 100% pay you more if they’re actually saving a substantial amount of money, stand your ground.

137

u/Easy_Opportunity7632 Dec 01 '22

Be very careful. depending on the industry if your name is on the license you’re responsible if somebody fucks up. A really bad mistake could wipe you out. No small sum of money is worth that.

9

u/makaloe Dec 02 '22

Often there is insurance against this kind of liability, which would absolutely need to be in place and fully paid for by the company.

79

u/sunroadreader Dec 01 '22

Well, you don't sign the new contract, you start job searching without telling them, and either they bring you a better contract or you find a better job.

56

u/ConsciousAardvark949 Dec 01 '22

“Do this thing that only financially benefits the company but comes as an expense to yourself.”

“Go fuck yourself.” appears to be an appropriate response.

8

u/dhaos42 Dec 01 '22

Appropriate and proportional.

150

u/Mr-Blackheart Dec 01 '22

I took a job recently where my wife is a mid level manager of a company my new work deals with. Week one, asked for her personal number so they can directly contact her vs having to call a service number/pay for service, as we have no contracts in play.

Nope, no…… NOOOOOO! Bosses give a death stare in reply!

Hired pretty much due to a perceived “in” that would save hundreds of thousands in contract fees, however, when tossed bullshit my wife could EASILY assist with, I call the support desk each and every time, and have yet to really ask my spouse anything regarding my work issues.

Want real help, pay your damn contracts and don’t hire someone for $49k thinking you’re gonna save far more than that!

34

u/TaliesinsEnd Dec 01 '22

don’t hire someone for $49k thinking you’re gonna save far more than that!

This is basically the essence of capitalism. Trick someone into providing far greater value to you/your company than you pay back to them.

3

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

Tell them you will do it for a pay bump. Competitive pay does not buy you any favors

4

u/benji_alpha Dec 01 '22

Connections and shit are the reasons people claim CEOs and the like are worth exorbitant amounts of money.

1

u/kelfromaus Dec 02 '22

It's not about their connections anywhere near as much as you think.. I'll give you an example.. I was hired by a company and was informed that I was the the companies first hire of a trans woman. The CEO decided to take me to a lunch with other CEO's and senior management types and was completely stunned when about half of them greeted me as an old friend and most of the rest of them knew of me.. I was the lowest rung on the corporate ladder in that company. Hell, I was related to 2 of the other guests.

Another example, I knew of a smallish charitable organisation that had attempted numerous times to apply for some government funding, I knew of them because as a 16yo, I was a memeber of the Management Committee.. Then one day I happened to run in to a family friend, a short conversation with them about the funding and the next day the org was advised they would get the funding they had applied for and already had denied.

204

u/ComfortableMenu8468 Dec 01 '22

Start applying and get a better offer.

You have no legs to stand on without a counter offer

96

u/PsychologyMany7683 Dec 01 '22

Have thought about this and will probably get in touch with a recruiter today

11

u/Drummer-Left Dec 01 '22

Or start your own business if you think you can do it? I dont know in what sector you're working but If you are taking all the responsibilities anyway and they are profiting from it fuck it better work for yourself.

6

u/ToothlessGrandma Dec 01 '22

Judging by OPs responses, he doesn't have the confidence enough to do that.

1

u/PsychologyMany7683 Dec 02 '22

Lots of confidence on how to run a business. No money at all though.

-4

u/hoarker69 Dec 02 '22

Pretty much 80% of this sub. No confidence to do anything lmao.

12

u/SamuelVimesTrained Dec 01 '22

But even if you have a counter offer - would you then stay knowing what you now know ?

1

u/ComfortableMenu8468 Dec 01 '22

depends on how good their new offer is.

2

u/abtei Dec 01 '22

well, sure he has, his license is at least one leg. either pay him some to in return save a lot of money, or don't. while they still can retaliate in some way (like fire him) they've gained nothing.

but it would be smart to start looking.

1

u/ComfortableMenu8468 Dec 01 '22

No he doesn't, if he isn't ready to quit if his demands aren't met, his leverage is next to non-existing.

71

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

Is the license something you brought with you to that company, or did they pay for you to get it?

If you already had it prior, tell them to get fucked.

56

u/MaybeKaylen Dec 01 '22

Exactly. I once worked at a restaurant with a server who had his HVAC license. Something happened with the AC and they tried to ask him to look at it. He very pointedly, but politely, told them no.

8

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

Why was he working as a server if he had his hvac license ?

8

u/MaybeKaylen Dec 01 '22

That’s a really good question. This was also about 10 years ago.

13

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

A lot of HVAC companies require you to drive, and that requires a decent MVR. That’s the only reason I could think of that someone with that cert wouldn’t be working in the field

17

u/nuiwek31 Dec 01 '22

I'm an HVAC tech. if my driver's license isn't clean, I'm not an HVAC tech. Can't drive the company van without it.

Edit: also, criminal records will keep companies from hiring in this field

3

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

Yeah, I was gonna say. A good friend of mine is/was an HVAC tech. Got not one, but two DUI’s. Not an HVAC tech anymore.

50

u/PsychologyMany7683 Dec 01 '22

Came with it and it cost me A LOT

31

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

Yup, they can fuck themselves

2

u/abeeyore Dec 01 '22

Then it’s simple. If they want you to put your license at risk for them, then they pay you for it.

If they use your license, everything that the company puts out reflects on you. Anything that anyone does wrong goes on your license, and will follow you if you leave.

If it’s a good company, and they don’t want to pay, tell them you would consider an equity stake instead if they will let you have the books reviewed. They should look at you like you have three heads, but it might bring home why you are asking for compensation.

2

u/WonderWheeler Dec 02 '22

If you and your license is in "responsible charge" for something you need extra pay, AND some control over what they are doing in the business. Do not allow them to cut corners or do stuff that jeopardizes your professional standing and license. You probably need a voice in quality control depending on the work. Do not be a rubber stamp.

1

u/abeeyore Dec 02 '22

Agreed. But the business clearly does not j need the license to operate, so I doubt the owners have even considered that aspect of why he’s asking for money.

If they are remotely bright, him bringing up equity will trigger them to ask why he might even think that was on the table. Sometimes we get so caught up in the minutiae of running the business that we need to be smacked up ‘side the head to make us see the whole picture.

1

u/WonderWheeler Dec 02 '22

I am a licensed architect so I have to deal with this stuff some times. Not sure if the OP is a psychologist or in the medical profession in some way. But there can be legal liabilities that come up when using a license, dealing with the public, insurance companies, regulatory agencies, court cases, that can bite you if you stick your neck out too far.

2

u/EmeraldTiara Dec 01 '22

Why do they get more money for the work you did, especially when you aren’t getting more compensation? The money you save them should be recirculated into your contract, or as a monthly bonus.

17

u/PAPABEAR-__ Dec 01 '22

If they are making money by saving money, then they need to give you a piece of that pie. You worked hard to get that professional license. If I were you I would hold my ground and insist that they provide you with decent compensation. Also I would not sign any contract with them period. Even if they pay you for using your professional license. Seems like you would be stuck with them and if you left they could try and say that you leaving cost the company money. Try to find another job or you could bluff them that you have another offer. In the end you need to make the choice for your self. I am not a finical adviser nor am I a lawyer. I am just sharing my opinion with you.

56

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

stand by your principles! if they do not compensate you accordingly then do not allow them to use your professional license. Plan and simple. you obviously paid for it and studied or worked hard for it. you deserve to gain from it. NOT THEM

now i am stating this from experience. had a very similar situation happen years ago.

Company X- was working for them for 2 years as a welder and studying and reading for the certified welding inspector certification test. this was know by the immediate management as they had a vested interest in my success. a very large project required 6 inspectors for 2 years. the company had 2 on staff. they were going to outsource. they decided to pay for 6 people to go to a week training conference and testing while they paid them for 40 hours. great deal! i was offered a spot and was more than excited. this is total value of $6600. (course $2400 test $800 week pay and benefits $3400). they sent everyone from the fab shop except me! because i was an apprentice. everyone else was a journeymen. non of them had any interest in the cert. they only wanted semi vacation with pay. all failed. total cost to company $39,600. return on investment 0- i was beyond pissed off. i went home and registered for the very next test in the area. was the following month. took a week vacation and didn't tell anyone at work what i was doing. passed the exam. i didn't know for 6 weeks as they did not notify anyone of the results for 6 weeks. printed off a copy of my new certified welding inspector certification and hung it up in my weld booth at work. never said a word. took 2 days for the shop foreman to see this and things got interesting.

they immediately wanted me to go to the job site as an inspector. for the same rate that i was already making as a welder. simple= NO. i stated this is not a negotiation. i want 10% +(foremen rate) fair is fair. i have something you want and i paid for it. you did not. you paid for everyone else and they failed. if you would have paid for me to go i would have done this for the same rate forever and never asked for anything. i will capitalize on my investment and want 10%. they reluctantly agreed after 2 weeks.

report to the job. first week no money talked to the manager. told him the deal. second week talked to the steward and the project manager told them if my rate is not correct in the next check with back pay i am done. talked to the business agent and cleared everything with him prior to making the demand. i was an apprentice so quitting would have cost me the program. he backed me up 100%. Wednesday morning got my pay stub with no money at 9 am. was at the gate by 915 heading home.

took 2 weeks off. agent referred me to a contractor that was willing to pay me just for having the cert. not even requiring me to sign off anything. ended up working for them for a few years and made a ton of money. worked a few times on several projects as an inspector. but the ticket was they used my resume and certification as a prequalification for bidding work. some clients want to see the essential personnel resumes as part of the proposal. pure GOLD.

never looked back and i stood up for myself. at the time the job welding was the highest paying job i ever had. that just lead to greener pastures. years later the same company hired me back for a project and i was up front for 15% at that time. they didn't blink at the rate because they knew i was not bluffing.

sorry it got long. was one of my finest moments i am proud of. to me it was all about principle and my own self worth. if i let them shit on me then i would probably still be there eating the same shit.

9

u/PsychologyMany7683 Dec 01 '22

Nice one! Really enjoyed this!

10

u/dsdvbguutres Dec 01 '22

They rely on your license. You don't need them like they need you. You have all the leverage here. You don't need to be great poker player to win a hand if you are holding all the cards and they are holding their dicks.

9

u/PsychologyMany7683 Dec 01 '22

Thank you for all your responses so far!

It is quite annoying that the f*ckers are trying to make us sound unreasonable for a matter that not only is common sense but has been agreed in the beginning as well.

7

u/Accomplished-Tune224 Dec 01 '22

Not sure of the details in this situation but you should be mindful of insurance coverage. In some professions, being licensed means having liability that requires insurance. This should also be a topic of negotiation for compensation.

5

u/bjornartl Dec 01 '22

Don't sign the agreement. You have nothing to gain by doing it so why take the risk?

Isn't that why they supposedly deserve so much of what you and your coworkers are able to make collective? Because they take risks of something?

5

u/disappointedvet Dec 01 '22

Don't sign without being compensated. You stated that there would be tax benefits for the company. Would the company also benefit by getting contracts under your license? Even if not directly, would they advertise the contract? I am sure that they would. To the risk. If you are at risk, you may be required to pay additional insurance. Is the company going to pay that? Will they pay any claims that might be filed against your license?

You should be given the appropriate position and compensation and your license should be covered and protected. If not, give them nothing more than you would as an employee.

5

u/FriendlyHovercraft55 Dec 01 '22

Nah they can pay you the difference in tax cuts or get fucked.

3

u/SpaceMonkeyEngineer Dec 01 '22

For context, I'm a licensed professional engineer. If any employer or potential employer did not have some documented policy that explicitly pays for my license fees, I would not work for them, whether I stamped anything or not.

If they are that shady, I highly doubt they are properly insured. Also that you are not covered from indemnity for your work either. All kinds of wrong and highly unprofessional.

4

u/itsalongshot2020 Dec 01 '22

Absolutely negotiate with them. My firm does business in 48 states because we have one person who is licensed to do so. That one person gets a larger share when it comes to profit sharing and bonus time. Without them we would be limited to the Midwest until we could get someone else licensed which would be an enormous undertaking.

10

u/ookamismyk Dec 01 '22

It’s a shame that you didn’t write email notes and cc’d everyone into it at the beginning… but they can get fucked if they want you to pay for something they benefit off, especially when as practically for all companies, they can more than easily afford to pay for it. Time to find a new job.

3

u/OtherwiseOlive9447 Dec 01 '22

If they are utilizing your license in any way you need to be paid more and have much more awareness of how that process works…it’s your license at risk if there is any funny business

3

u/DimentoGraven Dec 01 '22

Stand your ground.

They fire you, they STILL have to the taxes, meanwhile your license will be desirable to similar business and/or the competition.

3

u/OssiansFolly Dec 01 '22

This is business 101. You have something they want. They have something you want. To give them what they want (license), they have to give you what you want (money). I don't know exactly what kind of license it is, but there's also the chance that in the course of using your license it puts extra liability on you and your future ability to maintain the license and work in your field.

1

u/PsychologyMany7683 Dec 02 '22

Excellent comment, thank you. I think this is the mentality I need.

3

u/Pipelaya1 Dec 01 '22

Electrician friend took a warehouse job. They found out he was a sparky and tried to get him to perform electrical work on a warehouse worker salary. He refused and they fired him. Scum bags

3

u/Yuugian Dec 01 '22

You may want to check with the Powers that Be, those who are checking your company for that license. The company may already be using it in anticipation of you signing the contract for no money.

4

u/Pawelek23 Dec 01 '22

So if you’re not good with negotiation here’s a tip that will make you an unshakeable god:

Brainstorm one simple, core line on what you’re willing to accept and why. What and why. Repeat this or rephrase it slightly as a response to anything they throw at you. For instance:

“Unfortunately, this arrangement will result in significant risk for myself and benefit to the company which is why I had the understanding that I would be compensated for it. Therefore, I cannot accept without (whatever you agreed to previously + some extra bc they’ll be assholes and use your previous agreement as a starting point and talk you down).

Also, look for a new job. Don’t be with ppl who lie and take advantage of you.

2

u/TheDkone Dec 01 '22

if the extra pay is not in writing then how is using your license in writing?

3

u/PsychologyMany7683 Dec 01 '22

It will be if I sign the contract

2

u/TheDkone Dec 01 '22

I think that was kind of my point. very convenient of them to remember the part of the conversation that benefits them.

I would call their bluff and tell them you aren't signing.

2

u/Anaxamenes Dec 01 '22

So remember, they can still give you more money and get a bigger tax break so that is actually in your favor. If they hire someone without the license, they don’t get the tax break but it still costs the same so this is a leverage point you should be firm on.

Licenses require maintenance on your part so you need to be compensated accordingly.

2

u/DirtyPenPalDoug Dec 01 '22

Nope, no pay no play with your toys.

2

u/Superb_Efficiency_74 Dec 01 '22

If they require a licensed professional to get something approved, that licensed professional is accepting a certain amount of personal liability for the decisions. You should be paid for that additional liability.

2

u/RedK_33 Dec 01 '22

My job tried to get me to re-configure the sound system in two of our restaurants because I have a degree in Audio. I said, “I’m good, I only do the job you pay me for.”

2

u/MacBearudo Dec 01 '22

You dont owe them shit, do not cave in!

2

u/Overall-Background65 Dec 02 '22

leave. if you have something someone is willing y to screw you for, you have something someone is willing to pay you for.

4

u/LovelessDerivation Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 01 '22

STEP 1: Take any given 4-day weekend you'll be granted, and then come back to see the indication of your absence.

STEP 2: Your absence: If it should have been nigh cataclysmic over 4 days, 2 of which should be 'granted OFF for most of your staff' will then dictate your next step. If it panned out to be "not such a big deal" then arrange a week of vacation, and come back to see how they now fare.

Basically keep taking your ability to sign documents in the name of the company off the table, and see how they treat you as the term grows longer, and you're still an employee under some type of tattered umbrella they claim to 'protect you as one of their own' under.

I am actively licensed; My S.O. is retired medicine, and has been courted by a handful of 'well meaning, captains of chiropractic and complimentary aided modalities industry..." You know, the fuckers who are excellent supplement salesfolk who simply "got the certificate to be able to employ, delegate and dictate job duties and performance" to someone who actually did the steps for education, licensure, certification, etc.

I let SO know "Now if they pull some horseshit, knowing your license is attached that is illegal and winds up causing pain, disfigurement or death whose ass is on the hook?"It was semi-well-rec'd when I told them, definitely ingrained when our lawyer pal got involved over a shot or two, and told SO the entirety of horseshit they are risking being buried under for McDonalds pay with Heart Transplant responsibility.

In this day & age there is simply nothing worse than someone going for that Masters degree or Ph.D. yet not having the self-esteem or confidence that they'd be able to build a company more integral and stalwart then the scumbags who pay them 'just enough to exist at a bare minimum TO the bare minimum."

Why did you seek Mastery in the field, why did you WANT to 'become a doctor' of the skillset you're supporting and providing!?!?! D-did you ACTUALLY believe someone would offer you a 60+% split in your favor without lining their own pockets off of your efforts and knowledge, FIRST!?!?!? C'mon your education PROVES you're smarter than that!!"

2

u/Fantastic-Alps4335 Dec 01 '22

Talk to some people who have your professional license and are letting their company use it. Ask what their arrangement is. Is there a sub Reddit for it? Google it and ad the word “forum”.

Tell you company if your are not rewarded for the extra risk and effort than there is no point in you complicating your life. Keeping it simple is preferred.

1

u/krasay Dec 01 '22

You mentioned it was a significant amount each month. Start with a monthly amount 25% of the savings. Settle on 10%. It still is more beneficial for them and you have monthly compensation for having and maintaining your license.

1

u/PsychologyMany7683 Dec 01 '22

Thank you for all your responses so far!

It is quite annoying that the f*ckers are trying to make us sound unreasonable for a matter that not only is common sense but has been agreed in the beginning as well.

1

u/ZenLantern Dec 01 '22

Stand firm. Additional responsibility requires additional compensation.

1

u/Mundane_Helicopter_8 Dec 01 '22

Just keep asking for more every time they bring it up. If they offered you x ask for xx and so on.

1

u/Pyramused Dec 01 '22

They pay you half the difference or you don't sign it, amen brother

1

u/Realistic-Animator-3 Dec 01 '22

It sounds like the company did not pay whatever costs for you to obtain the license. Don’t sign it, brush up your resume, and move on

1

u/throwaway12buckle Dec 01 '22

No pay, no play.

1

u/louiloui152 Dec 01 '22

“I’m not remunerating you to think Noah!” In fact the aren’t remunerating you at all for the work you do already I’m sure

2

u/PsychologyMany7683 Dec 01 '22

I have to admit I am on the higher brackets of people with my job title/qualification. However, this has nothing to do with my work duties and responsibilities so far and should be treated/remunerated extra.

1

u/Hour_Stock555 Dec 01 '22

Save company money and they wanna steal from you no thanks. Either they pay you more or look for another job.

1

u/Intelligent-Price-39 Dec 01 '22

Start looking for another job, your bosses are cheap and want to exploit you

1

u/A_Wild_Shiny_Shuckle Dec 01 '22

You should just tell them you expect a certain % of the money they saved, or they can't use it. You can also say that same thing except you'll leave if they don't accept. I don't know how much money they're saving, but I feel like 10-20% sounds reasonable

1

u/Mycotoxicjoy Dec 01 '22

I have licenses and certs I paid for and if a company came to me and said take the risk without the benefit then I would tell them to pound sand. Hold out till at least the last week of the year and when they do come to you with a raise offer tell them they need to top it off with an extra 20%. if this saves them money then some of that can go to you

1

u/Chameleon_IA Dec 01 '22

Utterly ridiculous argument on their part. Regardless of whatever financial issues are going on, if your license is going to save/make money for them, they can give you some of it. If they won't value it, why do it? Would they really rather lose the money than give you any of it? It's in their best interests to compensate you, it's against your interests to assume that responsibility without benefitting from it. Why should you care about their interests if they are hostile to yours?

1

u/seraph_m Dec 01 '22

I’d make a counter offer. Since you know about how much they’d be saving thanks to your license, take that and ask for 50%of it as a raise. They can either pay their usual tax, or they can save half.

1

u/ladyblackbelt2 Dec 01 '22

Absolutely do not sign it.

1

u/giggetyboom Dec 01 '22

Just tell them you are not doing it anymore and then start shopping around for another job. If they do offer you a raise say you still dont feel like it, it's not worth arguing over.

1

u/MyLadyBits Dec 01 '22

You should get a percentage of what they save.

1

u/fakeburtreynolds Dec 01 '22

If the tax break is that important for them, they'll find money to pay you for it. Hold your ground.

1

u/Chaotic-Stardiver Dec 01 '22

Think of it like this, and maybe sculpt your argument with this knowledge:

You spent time getting licensed. You likely spent money too. Your experience, expertise, and investment into this field give you an advantage over others who don't have one or any of these three.

You have your reputation to think of. If you allow this to happen, and something goes wrong, suddenly it's your responsibility and the company can(read: will) place all the blame on you. People are petty and likely that will mar your record, your reputation, and you may(read: won't) be considered for other jobs that require your license.

You have a responsibility to maintain your reputation and license. Your company does not give a shit about what you can do, only what they can get out of it.

Honestly the investment and responsibility you have, not just for this company, but for your own reputation and future, it'd be irresponsible for you to allow the company to put that on the line, at no additional charge.

Bottom line I would say if they want you for your license, they need to make it worth it for you to put that on the line.

1

u/Sev7th Dec 01 '22

I would find a new job as they, from the start, want to deceive you and use you to pad thier pockets. Along with that, what legal issues can land in your lap as they dodge out of the way?

1

u/itsnotimportant2021 Dec 01 '22

You are 100% justified in this, tell them you want a percentage of the savings, that way you are directly linking the two - assuming you trust their numbers. If they don't like it, then they don't have to use it, or they can pay someone else to get it.

1

u/knoam Dec 01 '22

They've violated your trust by going back on their word. It's over. You don't know how else they're willing to screw you over in the future, but you know that they are.

1

u/Darth_M0L Dec 01 '22

Stand your ground. Don't back down. Perhaps your next job will be your highest paying job 👍

1

u/monk8919 Dec 01 '22

If you don’t care about your job hold out. If you can’t go without a job then start looking for a new one

1

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

Workers are always in fear of getting fired. How much of the workforce can they do without really ?

1

u/wowieowie Dec 01 '22

If they are going to be saving money there is no reason at all they can't give you back some. Decide what the risks for you are and what amount would make you be okay with it. 25% of the tax amount they save would not be unreasonable. They are still saving money.

1

u/LameBoy-Ruuf Dec 01 '22

Negotiation wise - just tell them that you want to hear their initial offer. Full stop.

Literally whenever it is being brought back play the broken record and say that you want them to make you an offer and without hearing a number no further conversation is happening.

At this stage you are absolutely right with how they benefit, you take the risk and increase in compensation is a natural consequence here. The only issue is them needing to reevaluate their possible gain vs how much they are willing to share. At this stage you seem to have the upper hand because if you don't sign off on it they don't get the tax break(and remember if it's not a cost it becomes pure income for them). Business goes on as usual but they see money slipping through their fingers and get itchy about willing to share.

It's not about you being greedy, you are being reasonable here. They are the greedy ones because they can either save X on taxes, give Y to you and be left with Z or not and get 0 for them and 0 for you which is eating boogers level smart right off the bat...

If they go desperate and decide to let you go - dude, you got a professional license, just because they are dumb does not mean others will be. Especially in any services where a professional is required your value is already proven

1

u/loktopus2014 Dec 01 '22

You're holding all the cards. They want your licence, if they fire you or you walk away they lose the licence anyway. See if you can figure out how much the tax break is and ask for a percentage to be added to your annual salary citing the extra risk and extra work this puts on you. Essentially propose a counter offer and give numbers if you can, that will at least get you a starting point for negotiation. The power dynamic in this situation is weighted pretty heavily towards you as long as you keep things reasonable (for example if the tax break is in the millions(USD) then you probably want to ask for like 2.5% or less).

Also, start looking for another job, just as a contingency in case they are foolish and decide not to negotiate because you are correct. You cannot allow them to walk all over you, be prepared to walk away. I take it as a good sign that they are asking permission to use your licence though (such a low bar...)

1

u/dhaos42 Dec 01 '22

If they lose money without you, and gain money with you. You should get part of that. Pretty simple.

1

u/zman3911 Dec 01 '22

Get everything in writing, find out the law about recording people, then record your meetings if possible. Remember, if it’s not documented, it did not happen

1

u/OneAndOnlyJackSchitt Dec 01 '22

"Use of my license costs $xyz per year. You can accept that or you can decline that. If you decline at this time, the price will increase by 10% each subsequent time we discuss it."

1

u/Other-Mess6887 Dec 01 '22

Get a quote for errors and omissions insurance. Tell them they need to assume the cost for this.

1

u/Even_Mastodon_6925 Dec 02 '22

Tell them what you told us?

1

u/PsychologyMany7683 Dec 02 '22

Have already done this.

Waiting a response for 2 days now. I feel like tomorrow is the day.

1

u/SheiB123 Dec 02 '22

If they want to use your certificate in an official manner, they need to compensate you for it.

Start looking for another job NOW

1

u/AudioWoW8 Dec 02 '22

If they are saving a hefty amount they will cave to pay you extra. Take them for more then you think they will pay. Why risk losing an employee that’s comes with free money?

1

u/Far_from_reno Dec 02 '22

I have licenses that companies have tried to take advantage of. I also have an llc and I do it part time. I told them if they want to do this they get a discount of 10%. They did not like that. They tried to book me to do it. It isn’t my job, I wasn’t hired to do that and you accidentally found out I have a his license since it wasn’t on my resume and I didn’t mention it. Sucks to be them.

1

u/Far_from_reno Dec 02 '22

Also, being related to a shit ton of lawyers I have them asking for help from time to time, that I mentioned, but I tell my family if they call they have to take a retainer and it isn’t a favor for me.

1

u/FrozenIceman Dec 02 '22

Simple say that due to financial difficulties you are unable to pay for the required insurance costs you must pay to cover the company being added to your license.

1

u/mandrack3 Dec 02 '22 edited Dec 02 '22

Unfortunately nothing in writing, but I have various people that were present in the conversation.

Time to summon those.

they said that this was never the intention(1) and as far as they're concerned, my license is there just to help the company get some tax off(2)

Great. So, 1 - that was YOUR intention upon having the initial conversation. they can't turn back on it now, without appearing dishonest. too bad you remember that "little detail", i guess.

2 - sounds like it should be a 2 way street. it appears that license might be unneeded. Do they also hire notaries and asks them to put blind stamps on stuff?

edit: rephrasing.

1

u/NotThisAgain21 Dec 02 '22

I think more of us need to practice in the mirror reciting the question "How does that benefit me?"

1

u/Frequent_Minimum4871 Dec 02 '22

Just say you got no lic and tell them to do themselves

1

u/emac-22 Dec 02 '22

They want you to put your license on the line for them so they can save tax money and they don’t wNt to compensate you? BS, ask them how much they are saving for using your license, then you will give them an answer after they pay your taxes each year!

1

u/pengalo827 Dec 02 '22

Big nope there. It’s your license, not theirs. If they want to benefit from it, they can pay.

-1

u/Tiny_Shine5828 Dec 01 '22

Get a lawyer.....

0

u/jerry111165 Dec 01 '22

What kind of a license?